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Server: Kubernetes, Apache Cassandra, and OpenStack Queens

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  • Container orchestration top trumps: Let's just pretend you don't use Kubernetes already

    Container orchestration comes in different flavours, but actual effort must be put into identifying the system most palatable.

    Yes, features matter, but so too does the long-term viability of the platform. There's been plenty of great technologies in the history of the industry, but what's mattered has been their viability, as defined by factors such as who owns them, whether they are open source (and therefore sustained by a community), or outright M&A.

    CoreOS, recently bought by Red Hat, offered Fleet. Fleet, alas for Fleet users, was discontinued because Kubernetes "won".

  • 6 ways Apache Cassandra prepares you for a multi-cloud future

    The incentives for enterprises to pursue a multi-cloud deployment strategy—a cloud-agnostic infrastructure, greater resilience, the flexibility that comes from not being reliant on any single vendor, to name just a few—have never been more compelling, and they are constantly increasing. Yes, the technological feat of implementing and managing deployments that straddle multiple clouds comes with some challenges. But as the need for this future-ready architecture increases, Apache Cassandra is a uniquely primed open source database solution for enabling such deployments.

  • How Containers Work in OpenStack Queens

    There are many different ways in which containers are used and enabled throughout the open-source OpenStack cloud platform. With the OpenStack Queens platform, which was released on Feb. 28, there are even more options than ever before.

    OpenStack has been supporting containers for several years, beginning with the nova-docker driver in the OpenStack Nova compute project that has now been deprecated. Among the different OpenStack container efforts in 2018 are Zun, Magnum, Kuryr, Kolla, LOCI, OpenStack-Helm and Kata containers.

  • The cost of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

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