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Edgy pushed me over the edge

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Ubuntu

Today I am running a year-old version of Ubuntu Linux. In the world of Ubuntu Linux, where new releases are issued every six months, year-old Breezy is distinctly old. Today I am running a year-old version of Ubuntu Linux. In the world of Ubuntu Linux, where new releases are issued every six months, year-old Breezy is distinctly old.

To be honest, I am not entirely unhappy with having to run Breezy, even if I do still have a little envy for those able to enjoy the bells and whistles of Edgy Eft.

But, after my recent experience with Edgy I am more than happy to stick with something a little less cutting edge and flashy. At least for now.

It started a couple of days after Edgy was released. I, like most eager Ubuntu fans, downloaded a copy of Edgy within hours of it being released. And then I set aside a couple of hours over the weekend to install and play with my new operating system.

The couple of hours quickly became many hours, and soon it was days.

Full Story.

Edgy install

A good guide as to whether its going to install OK is do I have at least 512MB RAM? If not it's almost a cert it won't install or run as a live CD.
Also 2 hours for 500Mb? time for a faster connection I think...
I have just tested this on an old laptop,256Mb won't run live and install freezes,put in an extra 512 and installs 8 minutes 31 secs.

re: Edgy

Today I'm wearing Velcro tennis shoes. To be honest, I don't like wearing them, and I don't even envy people who do like wearing them, but I didn't have a choice. As I was walking down the hallway that connects my house to my lab, I snagged one of my shoe laces and it broke - forcing me to change shoes (my lab has a very strict no shirt - no shoes - no multi-pathogenic experimentation rule).

Why do I feel the urge to share this. I really don't know. Nor do I know why people like this articles author feels the urge to share his lame edgy episode. When 9 zillion people can make something work correctly, you have to wonder why one person can't. Of course in America (land of numerous lawyers) it's possible to blame everyone but yourself for any and all problems, but doing so on a techie blog about technology that is well known for it's success seems a bit self defeating.

Luckily, I'll have new shoe laces tomorrow so my problem is solved, unfortunately, I'm guessing the articles author will still be using old and dated OS's.

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