Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gamers Get Off Their Butts at E3

Filed under
Gaming

After a frenetic couple of days racing from meeting to meeting at the annual E3 Expo trade show and free-for-all in Los Angeles earlier this month, I'm still exhausted. But there was a lot of interesting stuff to see, and thousands of gamers flooded the halls in anticipation of playing the games they may not see in stores for a year or more.

There were some very interesting trends at the show. The most significant trend seems to be the incorporation of movement into gaming. Game companies, aware of the spreading size of their customers' rear ends, seem to be building more games that involve the player standing up and doing something.

I wrote about a few of these so-called fitness gaming accessories last year. This year, there are more games--and more game controllers--that demand more than twitchy thumbs to get a high score.

Among the new, physically demanding games are Konami's latest additions to its incredibly popular Dance Dance Revolution series, in which you have to hop or stomp on a dance pad controller in sync with a rolling set of instructions on your TV screen. Konami also makes Karaoke Revolution, which requires you to sing along with a virtual band, and awards you points based on whether you sing on key and in the appropriate places.

The new game, Karaoke Revolution Party (available this fall for Sony's PlayStation 2), combines the footwork from Dance Dance Revolution with the singing of Karaoke Revolution. No longer will gamers merely be able to zone out in dance mode. Now they'll be forced to concentrate on two activities at once, and it looks like the hardest game I've ever watched someone else fail at.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Distributions News: Ubuntu, Manjaro, and Lakka

  • Ubuntu founder retakes the CEO throne, many employees gone
    Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonincal has once again returned to his positition of CEO, as Jane Silber, the previous CEO now heads to the Board of Directors; and big changes happen to the staff lineup as a result. In a blog bost by Sibler, she says, “I originally agreed to be CEO for 5 years and we’ve extended my tenure as CEO by a couple of years already. We’ve been preparing for a transition for some time by strengthening the executive leadership team and maturing every aspect of the company, and earlier this year Mark and I decided that now is the time to effect this transition.”
  • [Video] Manjaro 17.0 KDE Edition - See What’s New
    Manjaro 17.0 KDE is the latest release of Manjaro Linux. This release brings new KDE Plasma 5.9.x as desktop environment include the most of KDE applications 16.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.32.
  • Make your own NES Classic Edition with Lakka 2.0 LibreELEC Linux distro and Raspberry Pi
    The NES Classic Edition is a very fun nostalgia-based gaming console. As someone who grew up with Nintendo, I knew I wanted the mini system as soon as it was announced. A family member was able to score me one on launch day, and I've been very happy with it. Unfortunately, other people have not been so lucky. Supply was very limited and it has since been discontinued. If you do not already have it, you are sort of out of luck without paying high prices on eBay or Craigslist. If you are only looking to replay the NES games of your youth, and you are OK with doing it in an unofficial way, emulation is another route. In fact, if you'd rather not play these games on your PC, you can instead use a Linux-based operating system and a Raspberry Pi (or other devices) hooked to a television. One such distro is Lakka, which just reached version 2.0. It is arguably better than an NES Classic Edition as it can also play games from other systems, such as SNES, Sega Genesis, Nintendo 64, PlayStation 1, and many more.

Software: Monitoring Tools, VSXu, and FSearch

today's howtos

Linux Mint's Plans

  • Some Of The Features Coming To Linux Mint's Cinnamon 3.4 Desktop
    In the latest monthly progress report on Linux Mint, some of the upcoming changes for the GNOME3-forked Cinnamon Desktop Environment were shared.
  • Monthly News – April 2017
    Many thanks to all the people who donated to us and who help to fund our project. Donations are down to about 60% of what they were last year, but they’re still quite high. In the first trimesters of 2015, 2016 and 2017 we respectively received $23k, $40k and $25k. Our development team has gotten bigger and our budget is being extended to include some administrators and designers. Other figures and metrics indicate we’re growing so this probably just reflects an exceptional year for donations in 2016.
  • Linux Mint Is Adopting LightDM as its Login Manager
    Linux Mint is adopting the LightDM display manager to handle and authenticate user sessions. Revealing plans in its latest monthly update, Mint says it will formally drop the MDM Display Manager (MDM) in favour of LightDM with Mint 18.2, release date for which is as-yet unknown. The popular Ubuntu-based Linux distribution mooted a possible switch earlier this year, noting that it had a key feature MDM lacks (guest sessions), and has become something of a standard across distributions.
  • Linux Mint 13 support ends, LMDE to get MATE 1.18 soon, big changes heading to Cinnamon
    The news from the Linux Mint team was quite interesting this week. First up, Linux Mint 13 has officially hit EOL (end of life), so you really do need to upgrade. LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) is set to get the MATE desktop version 1.18 "this week" and they have ported mintMenu over to GTK3, since the rest of MATE is now using GTK3 too it makes sense.