Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Doom 3 1.3.1302 Linux Performance

Filed under
Gaming

A few days ago, a new point release for Doom 3 was released along with an SDK (Software Development Kit) update. Among other things, there are some substantial improvements in the Linux update, mainly with PunkBuster, EAX support, the installer, and variety of other fixes. Overall, Timothee Besset (Doom 3 Linux port maintainer) has done a great job with this new patch, however, are there any performance benefits or losses from this latest patch? The id Software Doom 3 1.3.1302 patch performance is the focus of this article.

One of the un-documented adjustments in the standard change log is the adoption of a new installer. We feel the 1.3.1302 installer is MUCH improved over the 1.1.1282 and 1.1.1286 versions.

As Timothee Besset, the Doom 3 Linux port maintainer, was facing some troubles with using SSE2 code in the initial Doom 3 Linux release, we were expecting to see some performance benefits when we had upgraded to this new release (1.3.1302). Unfortunately, this wasn't exactly the case. Once we had upgraded, there was roughly a 4-10 FPS drop in the average frame-rate in all of the different benchmarks we ran. The results however were much closer as the image quality on the 1.3.1302 version was increased. Even with the decrease in performance, and we hope this is only a temporary situation until the next patch is released, the substantial changes made in Doom 3 v1.3 can significantly enhance the game-play thus it's recommended to make the Doom 3 upgrade.

Full Review with benchmarks and graphs.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017