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More on the Novell-Microsoft agrement: Interview with Justin Steinman (Novell)

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SUSE

The Internet was buzzing these days about the recent Novell-Microsoft agreement. Under an unprecedented deal, Microsoft has agreed to offer sales support for SUSE Linux and start working on interoperability. Furthermore, the Redmond giant agreed not to use it's patent portofolio to sue SUSE Linux users. We wanted to know more, you wanted to know more, so we went straight to the source and began asking.

Let's see what Novell has to say about this agreement as Justin Steinman, Director of Marketing for Linux & Open Platform Solutions for Novell, answers some questions on LinuxInterviews.com.

LinuxInterviews.com: The recent announcement made by Novell and Microsoft surely shook up the entire Linux/OSS world. What does this deal provide Novell's customers?

Justin Steinman: Customers have repeatedly told Novell that flexibility is an increasingly important part of their data center. At a time when CIOs are being asked to do more with less and improve utilization, virtualization is key to solving that problem. Novell and Microsoft each realize that the data center of the future will have both Linux and Windows as significant platforms. This agreement is all about making those two platforms work together, and providing the enterprise support for the interoperability that customers demand. By working together, Novell and Microsoft enable customers to choose the operating system that best fits their applications and business needs.

LinuxInterviews.com: What does this deal mean for Novell?

Full Story.

Also:

Here's something a little different. Novell has sent a letter to Judge Dale Kimball, with a suggestion. The suggestion is that he not decide which case should go first, SCO v. Novell or SCO v. IBM, until after dispositive motions are decided in both cases.

Novell's letter shows what prompted it -- SCO and IBM have sent two letters to the judge, one on October 27 and another on October 31, both about trial timing. We don't have those letters, but it seems SCO has done a 180 and is now asking the court to *advance* the Novell trial date, which Novell points out is "diametrically opposed to their relief SCO just sought and was in part granted."

Novell Sends a Letter to Judge Kimball.

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