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Games: Free Software From Feral Interactive

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Gaming
  • Feral Interactive have released an open source tool that’ll help get the most performance out of Linux games

    GameMode is a new daemon/lib combo for Linux that will allow you to optimize your PC for gaming. It’s not magic, it won’t suddenly make your Linux games suddenly get better performance, but it’s something that can help.

  • Feral Releases "GameMode" System Tool For Linux, Currently Sets CPU Scaling Governor

    Ahead of this month's Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux release, Feral Interactive has released a new system tool for Linux called GameMode.

    GameMode is an open-source tool intended to deliver the best performance out of their Linux games. GameMode does handy things like tells the CPU to automatically run in the performance governor mode rather than ondemand/powersave modes. GameMode consists of a daemon (gamemoded) and a library (libgamemode) so that games can tell the daemon when they would like to be put into performance mode, etc.GameMode currently relies upon systemd.

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