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Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

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  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans

    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results.

    We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs.

    Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.

  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas

    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release".

    But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime.
    Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

More in Tux Machines

End of LibrePlanet 2019

  • Questioning and Finding Purpose
    This is copied over from my spiritual blog. I'm nervous doing that, especially at a point when I'm more vulnerable than usual in the Debian community. Still, this is who I am, and I want to be proud of that rather than hide it. And Debian and the free software community are about far more than just the programs we write. So hear goes: The Libreplanet opening keynote had me in tears. It was a talk by Dr. Tarek Loubani. He described his work as an emergency physician in Gaza and how 3d printers and open hardware are helping save lives. They didn't have enough stethoscopes; that was one of the critical needs. So, they imported a 3d printer, used that to print another 3d printer, and then began iterative designs of 3d-printable stethoscopes. By the time they were done, they had a device that performed as well or better than than a commercially available model. What was amazing is that the residents of Gaza could print their own; this didn't introduce dependencies on some external organization. Instead, open/free hardware was used to help give people a sense of dignity, control of some part of their lives, and the ability to better save those who depended on them. Even more basic supplies were unavailable. The lack of tourniquets caused the death of some significant fraction of casualties in the 2014 war. The same solution—3d-printed tourniquets had an even more dramatic result. Dr. Loubani talked about how he felt powerless to change the world around him. He talked about how he felt like an insignificant ant.
  • LibrePlanet Day 2: Welcoming everyone to the world of free software
    One of the most important questions that free software is facing in the year 2019 is: how do we make the world of free software accessible to broader audiences? Vast numbers of people are using software every day -- how do we relate our message to something that is important to them, and then welcome them into our community? In order to achieve our mission, we need to invite people and get them to use, create, and proliferate ethical software, until it replaces until all technology is free. Many of the best talks at LibrePlanet 2019 echoed a message for the free software community to focus on building a culture that's respectful and encouraging for new people, respecting a wide variety of personalities and values. The first way to get people invested in the culture of free software is to make it fun, and that was the focus of the morning keynote, "Freedom is fun!", delivered by free software veteran Bdale Garbee. A prominent name in the free software world for decades, Bdale talked about how he has a habit of turning all of his hobbies into free software projects, starting with model rockets.

Python Programming: PyPy 7.1 and More

  • PyPy v7.1 released; now uses utf-8 internally for unicode strings
    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the double release. This release, coming fast on the heels of 7.0 in February, finally merges the internal refactoring of unicode representation as UTF-8. Removing the conversions from strings to unicode internally lead to a nice speed bump. We merged the utf-8 changes to the py3.5 branch (Python3.5.3) but will concentrate on 3.6 going forward. We also improved the ability to use the buffer protocol with ctype structures and arrays.
  • PyPy 7.1 As The Well Known Alternative Python Implementation
    Last month brought the release of PyPy 7.0 as the JIT-ed performance-optimized Python implementation. PyPy 7.0 brought alpha Python 3.6 support, an updated CFFI module, and other enhancements. Out now is PyPy 7.1 as its successor.
  • Python’s “else” clause for loops
  • EuroPython 2019: Presenting our conference logo for Basel
    The logo is inspired by graphical elements from the Basel Jean Tinguely Museum and Basel Rhine Swimming. It was again created by our designer Jessica Peña Moro from Simétriko, who had already helped us in previous years with the conference design.

15 Useful And Best Media Server Software For Linux

There is no doubt that Linux is multi-purpose operating systems. It has gone far from being the operating systems for system administrators or for the programmers. You can use it for many purpose. In this post, We will talk about some of the best Media server software for Linux so that you can turn your Linux to media server instantly. Read more

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE, Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch and GNU World Order

  • Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE Through
    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.4. Enjoy!
  • Linux Action News 98
    Is Linux gaming really being saved by Google's Stadia platform? We discuss the details and possibilities. Plus good news for KDE Connect users, Intel begins work on next-generation open source video drivers, and much more.
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5
    The Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5 is here once again! Another week, another ton of news and so here's your bite-sized take at a few interesting topics for those struggling to keep up. As usual, it has a video to give your eyes as well as your ears a feast or just the plain audio to listen to on the go.
  • gnuWorldOrder_13x13