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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is out

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS has been released. The new version of Ubuntu is available in Desktop, Server, Cloud and core variants, and it is a long-term support release which means that the Desktop, Server, Core and Kylin releases will be supported for five years until April 2023.

You can download the release version by following links in the release notes. The main Ubuntu website and download pages have yet to be updated.

Ubuntu systems running Ubuntu 16.04 LTS or Ubuntu 17.10 can be upgraded in the following way:

Read more

More on Release

  • Canonical Announces Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Here Is What's New

    Canonical officially announced today its Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system for computers, IoT, and cloud environments.

    More than six months in the works, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is dubbed "Bionic Beaver" and it's Canonical's seventh LTS (Long Term Support) release. It will be supported with security and software updates for five years, until April 2023, during which it will receive no less than five maintenance updates, each one bringing updated kernel and graphics stacks from newer Ubuntu releases.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver”, Available Now

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is a huge change from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. This is the first long-term support (LTS) release after the massive changes of Ubuntu 17.10, which saw the end of the Unity desktop, Ubuntu Phone, and Ubuntu’s convergence plans.

    If you were already using Ubuntu 17.10, you won’t notice any big changes. Ubuntu 18.04 focuses on polishing the changes made in Ubuntu 17.10. However, while Ubuntu 17.10 used the Wayland display server by default, Ubuntu 18.04 switches back to the tried-and-true Xorg display server.

  • Official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Release, Gmail Redesign, New Cinnamon 3.8 Desktop and More

    Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" LTS is scheduled to be released officially today. This release features major changes, including kernel version updated to 4.15, GNOME instead of Unity, Python 2 no longer installed by default and much more. According to the release announcement "Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS includes the Queens release of OpenStack including the clustering enabled LXD 3.0, new network configuration via netplan.io, and a next-generation fast server installer. See the Release Notes for download links.

Latest Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS arrives with Gnome desktop, Kuberflow and Nvidia GPU acceleration

    CANONICAL HAS LAUNCHED the latest version of Ubuntu's Long Term Support edition - 18.04 LTS - and it contains a number of new offerings both for Desktop and Server use.

    LTS represents a version of Ubuntu that offers a full five-year support. There will be many versions of the operating system in the coming months, but each, though stable, is only supported for nine months, giving the option to either keep updating or go to the LTS stream.

    One of the big draws will be improved AI support - most notably, integration of Kuberflow - the Tensorflow for Kubernetes, Google's cloud containerisation platform. Kubernetes is of course supported under the CDK moniker (Canonical Deployment of Kubernetes).

  • Ubuntu’s Latest “Bionic Beaver” OS Impresses with Range of New Features

    Canonical (the company behind Ubuntu) today released the latest version of its popular operating system, code-named ‘Bionic Beaver’; big news for both organisations and users looking to be on the cutting edge of security, multi-cloud, containers and AI.

    Computer Business Review took a look. So, what’s new?

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS: What’s New? [Video]

    The stable Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release arrives later today which make now a great time to swat up on the changes the 'Bionic Beaver' brings with it.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver is here

    Canonical is releasing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS today. Code-named “Bionic Beaver,” the latest version of the popular GNU/Linux distribution includes a number of updates including a newer Linux kernel, mitigations to help protect users from Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, and a number of tweaks for the user interface and core apps.

  • Why Canonical Hasn’t Released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Yet?

    Today is 26th April: the Ubuntu 18.04 release day. As it’s an LTS release, this day has a lot of importance for a Linux enthusiast who loves Ubuntu — the most popular open source operating system around.

    The official and final release images of Ubuntu should be released anytime soon, but that hasn’t happened yet. The official Release Notes page still says: “Ubuntu 18.04 LTS HAS NOT BEEN RELEASED YET and is not recommended for use on production systems or on your primary computers yet.”

  • New Ubuntu Rethinks Desktop Ecosystem

    The development team used Ubuntu version 17.10 as its proving ground for transitioning from Unity 7 to the GNOME shell. Primarily, that was for its long-term support.

    That transition proved that users would have a seamless upgrade path, Cooke said. The five-year support also set the groundwork for developers to build for a common platform, as the same Ubuntu version runs in the cloud and on all devices.

    "This is the main reason we continue to see uptake on Ubuntu from developers," he remarked. Ubuntu offers "reliability and a proven background of uptake and security, and other critical packages."

  • Top Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver To Make It Your Own

    The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) release is just around the corner, so we've prepared a list of top things to do after installing it.

    Whether you're new to Ubuntu or a long-time user, there are things you may forget to do after installing a new Ubuntu version. This list tries to cover all users, to help get most things set up so you can enjoy your new Ubuntu 18.04 LTS desktop and customize it to accommodate your needs.

  • What To Do After Installing Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    This is the traditional article to give you suggestions what to do after installing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver". I divide the discussions in two parts, with and without internet. You will start with familiarizing yourself to the new desktop in Ubuntu and finally find your favorite applications using Ubuntu Software. I hope this quick guide helps you a lot. Enjoy 18.04!

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Released, This is What’s New

    The Ubuntu 18.04 release is ready to download. We review the new Ubuntu 18.04 features, share download links and upgrade instructions, and more in this in-depth article.

  • Download Links for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Official Flavors

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