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Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Getting Started:

First Impressions:

My first attempt at booting into this live CD edition of Ubuntu ended in a hung machine. This was disappointing. However, when I tried again with the safe video mode it booted perfectly. Since this probably had more to do with my old twitchy test hardware than the distro I give them a pass on this one.

On with the install:

Upon booting up I was taken to a nice looking albeit brownish (not a big fan of brown) desktop. The desktop contained a single icon named Install. So a gave it a click.

Full Story.

re: Ubuntu Christian Edition

Yawn.

Write when your god (or any god for that matter) actually shows up and helps with the install (or better yet, with the coding).

Until then, leave the Ubuntu coverage to the other type of fanatics (you know, the Ubuntu freaks - at least they're more believable).

You can thank God for...

You can thank God for allowing you to draw the breath that let you yawn at this review. For creating you in such a way that you are capable of communicating with others and understanding when they attempt to communicate with you, as in this review. For giving you the freedom to choose not to believe in Him.

How about inspiration? After all, isn't the computer a cheap imitation of the human brain? What you have there under your skull is a parallel processor of unfathomable proportions, running an operating system that performs hundreds of tasks simultaneously. Under the category of automated daemons, your mind automatically monitors and regulates temperature, repairs its chassis, maintains necessary chemical stability, cleans and lubricates your optic sensors, and provides an interface to exotic hardware that we have, for the most part, been unable to replicate or even simulate.

Do you believe that this complicated, beautiful mesh of machinery and code happened by chance? If I tried to argue that Linux came about when Linus Torvalds took a microcomputer and locked it in a garage for two months, I'd be laughed off the street. If I argued that Linux came about when some ancient mathematician buried an abacus behind a rock 4400 years ago, I'd get a similar reaction. If I tried to argue that the code for Linux developed from some marks on a rock 3 billion years ago, nobody would believe me. Just by looking at the code for Linux, and the way it lets us interact with hardware, we have to, as thinking beings, conclude that somebody designed Linux. Moreover, we know who did... Linus Torvalds. We've read the stories. Some people have received emails from him. Others have met him face-to-face. I've never met Linus, never gotten an email from him, never seen his picture online... but I believe he exists. I've had a lot more contact with God, and seen a lot more evidence for Him than I have for Linus Torvalds...

But I suppose none of this impresses you. After all, the only group of people it's politically correct to pick on and hate anymore is Christians. Think about that the next time somebody ridicules YOU.

re: you can

Spinlock wrote:
After all, the only group of people it's politically correct to pick on and hate anymore is Christians.

Grow up.

I think anyone over the age of 5 that believes in a Santa Claus figure is stupid beyond compare.

I don't care what flavor of religion you delude yourself with - they're all one big fairy tale used to herd the sheep of their communities into supporting the charlatans that lead their sham organizations.

It never ceases to amaze me how many people lack the brainpower to determine fact from fiction.

Lack of brainpower, eh?

Santa Claus figure? You apparently have no idea. No idea whatsoever.

So what you're suggesting is that anyone who believes in God is an idiot? Okay. Here's a (small) list of people you've got to answer for:

Isaac Newton
Robert Boyle
Albert Einstein
Michael Faraday
Lord Kelvin
Robert Dalton
Louis Pasteur
Johann Kepler
William Herschel
Galileo Galilei
Blaise Pascal
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
Carolus Linnaeus
Jean Deluc
Georges Cuvier
James Joule
Rudolph Virchow
Gregor Mendel
Joseph Lister
Bernhard Reimann
James Clerk Maxwell
P.G. Tait
John Ambrose Fleming
George Washington Carver
Dr. John Baumgardner

Note that several of the above made contributions to science or mathematics which lead to the foundation of computer science.

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