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Mozilla: WebAssembly, WebExtensions, Firefox Starts Testing 3rd-Party VPN Service

  • WebAssembly’s post-MVP future: A cartoon skill tree
    People have a misconception about WebAssembly. They think that the WebAssembly that landed in browsers back in 2017—which we called the minimum viable product (or MVP) of WebAssembly—is the final version of WebAssembly. I can understand where that misconception comes from. The WebAssembly community group is really committed to backwards compatibility. This means that the WebAssembly that you create today will continue working on browsers into the future. But that doesn’t mean that WebAssembly is feature complete. In fact, that’s far from the case. There are many features that are coming to WebAssembly which will fundamentally alter what you can do with WebAssembly. I think of these future features kind of like the skill tree in a videogame. We’ve fully filled in the top few of these skills, but there is still this whole skill tree below that we need to fill-in to unlock all of the applications.
  • Firefox 63.0 Available With WebExtensions On Linux Now Run In Their Own Process
    Ahead of the expected official release announcement tomorrow, Firefox 63.0 is now available from the Mozilla servers. Firefox 63.0 is notable for Linux desktop users in that WebExtensions now run in their own processes. There are a number of other changes though that benefit exclusively macOS and Windows users.
  • Mozilla Firefox Starts Testing 3rd-Party VPN Service
    It seems like Mozilla is following the footsteps of Opera. A German website reports that Mozilla will start testing commercial VPN for a few users in the USA, starting from today. Unlike Opera that offers its own VPN service, Mozilla is partnering with Swiss VPN provider ProtonVPN to use their networking resources for a more, advanced level of security.

I3C Subsystem Appears Ready For Possible Inclusion Into Linux 4.20~5.0

There is already a lot of features slated for the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel with its development cycle officially having gotten underway this morning. Adding to that lengthy list of expected work is the possible introduction of the I3C subsystem. Back in January 2017 MIPI announced the I3C sensor interface specification as an improvement over the widely-used I2C. With I3C the focus was on combining the best of the I2C, SPI, and UART specifications while tailoring it so it's suitable for use by IoT devices. Going back to shortly after the specification's debut, there have been an in-development I3C subsystem for enabling drivers and these devices to be supported by the mainline Linux kernel. Read more

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD Against FOSS

The Linux Foundation News and Interviews