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Security: DHCP, System Updates, and Ubuntu Blobs Store

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Security
  • Protect your Fedora system against this DHCP flaw

    A critical security vulnerability was discovered and disclosed earlier today in dhcp-client. This DHCP flaw carries a high risk to your system and data, especially if you use untrusted networks such as a WiFi access point you don’t own. Read more here for how to protect your Fedora system.

    Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) allows your system to get configuration from a network it joins. Your system will make a request for DHCP data, and typically a server such as a router answers. The server provides the necessary data for your system to configure itself. This is how, for instance, your system configures itself properly for networking when it joins a wireless network.

    However, an attacker on the local network may be able to exploit this vulnerability. Using a flaw in a dhcp-client script that runs under NetworkManager, the attacker may be able to run arbitrary commands with root privileges on your system. This DHCP flaw puts your system and your data at high risk. The flaw has been assigned CVE-2018-1111 and has a Bugzilla tracking bug.

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Potentially Malicious Bytecoin Miner Removed from the Ubuntu Snap Store
  • Canonical on trust and security in the Snap Store

    Here's a posting from Canonical concerning the cryptocurrency-mining app that was discovered in its Snap Store.

  • Canonical finds hidden crypto-miners in the Linux Snap app store

    Last Friday, Canonical, the developer of the popular Ubuntu operating system and owner of the Snapcraft app store, spotted one application surreptitiously mining cryptocurrencies in the background.

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As part of the research project on “The Interaction between Open Source Software and FRAND licensing in Standardisation”, a workshop was organised by the European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) in collaboration with Directorate General Communications Networks, Content and Technology (CONNECT) to present and discuss the intermediate results to date. The workshop took place in Brussels on September 18, 2018. I presented a set of observations from the research on the case studies performed as part of the project that are outlined below. Other speakers where Catharina Maracke on the issue of legal compliance between Open Source and FRAND licenses, Bruce Perens on “Community Dynamics in Open Source”, and Andy Updegrove on “Dynamics in Standardisation”. You may ask what the relevance of this debate is for the wider Free and Open Source Software community. The obvious answer is that to distribute software “without restriction”, the user needs all the usage rights associated with the program. While most FOSS contributors assume that this is naturally the central motivation for anybody to contribute in the first place, there is a long history of attempts to maintain some sort of exclusive control over a piece of FOSS code, possibly using other rights than copyright. Read more

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