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Security: DHCP, System Updates, and Ubuntu Blobs Store

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Security
  • Protect your Fedora system against this DHCP flaw

    A critical security vulnerability was discovered and disclosed earlier today in dhcp-client. This DHCP flaw carries a high risk to your system and data, especially if you use untrusted networks such as a WiFi access point you don’t own. Read more here for how to protect your Fedora system.

    Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) allows your system to get configuration from a network it joins. Your system will make a request for DHCP data, and typically a server such as a router answers. The server provides the necessary data for your system to configure itself. This is how, for instance, your system configures itself properly for networking when it joins a wireless network.

    However, an attacker on the local network may be able to exploit this vulnerability. Using a flaw in a dhcp-client script that runs under NetworkManager, the attacker may be able to run arbitrary commands with root privileges on your system. This DHCP flaw puts your system and your data at high risk. The flaw has been assigned CVE-2018-1111 and has a Bugzilla tracking bug.

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Potentially Malicious Bytecoin Miner Removed from the Ubuntu Snap Store
  • Canonical on trust and security in the Snap Store

    Here's a posting from Canonical concerning the cryptocurrency-mining app that was discovered in its Snap Store.

  • Canonical finds hidden crypto-miners in the Linux Snap app store

    Last Friday, Canonical, the developer of the popular Ubuntu operating system and owner of the Snapcraft app store, spotted one application surreptitiously mining cryptocurrencies in the background.

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