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Software: Neofetch, QOwnNotes, FreeOffice, LabPlot, Elisa

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Software
  • Display System Information On Linux With Neofetch (Version 4.0.0 Available)

    Neofetch is a terminal-based system information tool that displays not only information about your desktop settings, but also about your operating system and hardware, like the CPU and GPU, system memory, kernel, uptime, and much more.

    What you see in the screenshot is not all Neofetch can show. You can customize it to show a lot more information - from CPU temperature to public IP, disk information, currently playing song, and so much more.

    Neofetch can even display your current wallpaper instead of the ASCII OS logo if it meets the requirements:

  • QOwnNotes 18.05.3

    QOwnNotes is a open source (GPL) plain-text file notepad with markdown support and todo list manager for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, that (optionally) works together with the notes application of ownCloud (or Nextcloud). So you are able to write down your thoughts with QOwnNotes and edit or search for them later from your mobile device (like with CloudNotes) or the ownCloud web-service. The notes are stored as plain text files and you can sync them with your ownCloud sync client. Of course other software, like Dropbox, Syncthing, Seafile or BitTorrent Sync can be used too.

  • FreeOffice 2018 Released with “Complete Support” For Microsoft Office Files

    SoftMaker FreeOffice 2018 is now available to download for Windows and Linux.

    Developed by Germany-based software company SoftMaker, the office suite is both free to download and free to use — so if you’re on the hunt for a free Microsoft Office alternative for Linux you’ll almost certainly want to check it out.

  • LabPlot Support for live data

    Coming close to the next release of LabPlot, the last new feature in this release that we want to introduce is the support for live data. This feature developed by Fábián Kristóf during “Google Summer of Code 2017” program. In this context, the support for live data refers to the data that is frequently changing and the ability of the application to visualize this changing data.

    Prior to the upcoming release, the only supported workflow in LabPlot was to import the data from an external file into LabPlot’s data containers and to do the visualization. On data changes, the user needed to re-import again. With LabPlot 2.5 we introduced the “Live Data Source” object that is “connected” to the actual data source and that takes care of re-reading the changed data according to the specified options.

  • News about Elisa

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

More in Tux Machines

Security: Lustre, Aqua Security, Election Security and Reproducible Builds

  • Fix for July's Spectre-like bug is breaking some supers
    High-performance computing geeks are sweating on a Red Hat fix, after a previous patch broke the Lustre file system. In July, Intel disclosed patches for another Spectre-like data leak bug, CVE-2018-3693. Red Hat included its own fixes in an August 14 suite of security patches, and soon after, HPC sysadmins found themselves in trouble. The original report, from Stanford Research Computing Center, details a failure in LustreNet – a Lustre implementation over InfiniBand that uses RDMA for high-speed file and metadata transfer.
  • Aqua Security Launches Open-Source Kube-Hunter Container Security Tool
    Aqua Security has made its new Kube-hunter open-source tool generally available, enabling organizations to conduct penetration tests against Kubernetes container orchestration deployments. Aqua released Kube-hunter on Aug.17, and project code is freely available on GitHub. Rather than looking for vulnerabilities inside of container images, Kube-hunter looks for exploitable vulnerabilities in the configuration and deployment of Kubernetes clusters. The project code is open-source and can be run against an organization's own clusters, with additional online reporting capabilities provided by Aqua Security.
  • Election Security Bill Without Paper Records and Risk Limiting Audits? No Way.
    The Senate is working on a bill to secure election infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, but, unless amended, it will widely miss the mark. The current text of the Secure Elections Act omits the two most effective measures that could secure our elections: paper records and automatic risk limiting audits. Cybersecurity threats by their very nature can be stealthy and ambiguous. A skillful attack can tamper with voting machines and then delete itself, making it impossible to prove after the fact that an election suffered interference. Paper records ensure that it is possible to detect and quickly correct for such interference. Automatic audits ensure that such detection actually happens.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #173

Android Leftovers

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Receives L1 Terminal Fault Mitigations, Update Now

According to the security advisory published on Monday, the new kernel security update addresses both CVE-2018-3620 and CVE-2018-3646 vulnerabilities, which are known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) or Foreshadow. These vulnerabilities had an impact on normal systems, as well as virtualized operating systems, allowing a local attacker to expose sensitive information from the host OS or other guests. "Multiple researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the way the Intel processor designs have implemented speculative execution of instructions in combination with handling of page-faults. This flaw could allow an attacker controlling an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary (non-user controlled) addresses," reads today's security advisory. Read more