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Open Country Debuts OCM™ Webmin Plus

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Open Country Enhances Webmin System Administration Tool with Bacula® Network Backup Capability and Launches Community Site

BELMONT, CA – November 21, 2006 – Open Country, a next-generation systems management software company, today announced the debut of OCM™ Webmin Plus, an enhanced release of the popular Webmin open source IT system administration tool. OCM Webmin Plus, developed in partnership with Webmin creator Jamie Cameron, is the first open source product from Open Country, providing a new, low-cost way to easily manage Linux computing environments.

OCM Webmin Plus, available at no charge, adds a number of valuable enhancements to Webmin beginning with an enterprise-grade graphical user interface for Bacula®, a comprehensive network backup program. When used in conjunction with Open Country’s flagship product, OCM Manager, OCM Webmin Plus can deliver even more powerful features, such as the ability to identify and schedule backups of entire node groups as easily as backing up a single system.

“Open Country is the exclusive corporate sponsor of the Webmin project and we wanted to give back to the Webmin community not only an enhanced product, but also a community forum to galvanize the hundreds of thousands of Webmin users. OCM Webmin Plus is the first of many products that will enhance the value of OCM, winner of the Linux Journal’s “Best Systems Management Tool” award,” said Laurent Gharda, President and CEO of Open Country. “We believe enterprise IT managers are ready for an enhanced version of the popular Webmin application that ships with most Linux distributions today. Webmin users will appreciate the additional features and capabilities in OCM Webmin Plus—while OCM users will find OCM Webmin Plus a welcome addition to their systems administration toolset.”

Webmin, released in its original form in 1997, has been downloaded millions of times and is generally regarded as the number one open source IT systems administration application. The product, accessible via any Web browser, lets IT managers perform tasks including account creation, Web server setup, firewall installation, MySQL/PostgreSQL database management, Windows file sharing and much more. Because Webmin has a modular design, anyone can develop and distribute their own

Webmin modules for any purpose. Over 100 such modules have been created and are freely available via the Webmin Web site, www.webmin.com.

“OCM Webmin Plus places Webmin under OCM’s convenient GUI with support for OCM features and capabilities,” said Cameron. “Those advantages, combined with integrated Bacula backup/restore, makes this product a highly attractive and useful alternative for enterprise-level IT installations. What’s more, Open Country is committed to further developing the OCM Webmin product line to meet the management needs of the widest range of IT professionals.”

In support of OCM Webmin Plus, Open Country has established an OCM Webmin forum on SourceForge.net. OCM Webmin Plus will be available for download under a Mozilla-like license from the SourceForge community page at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ocmwebminplus/.

About Open Country:
Open Country helps organizations significantly simplify the management of existing enterprise Linux systems. The majority of IT costs involve repeated problem solving across the enterprise or from one enterprise to the next. Open Country enables IT managers to solve a problem once and effectively leverage the solutions across the organization. Open Country’s OCM™ Universal Systems Management Suite and OCM Webmin support the largest number of Linux distributions in the industry. By eliminating “lock-in” to one software platform, Open Country’s OCM™ helps customers choose the best and most cost-effective options to power their enterprises. Open Country is based in Belmont, Calif., and can also be found at www.opencountry.com.

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