Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux server revenue continues to grow at double-digit pace

Filed under

After Gartner the US American market researchers of IDC have now published an analysis of the server market. According to which in the first quarter of 2005 spending on servers world-wide was just under ten billion euros. In the eighth consecutive quarter of revenue growth this amounts to a quarter on quarter increase of 5.3 percent.

According to IDC about 10 percent of that revenue was generated by the Linux server business, which grew year over year by 35 percent and has now posted its eleventh consecutive quarter of double-digit growth. With revenue of 3.3 billion euros Windows servers registered year-over-year revenue growth of 12.3 percent. Thereby pulling even with quarterly revenue of Unix servers, the year-over-year revenue growth of which was a mere 2.8 percent.

IBM retained its top rank in the worldwide server systems market with a market share of 28.3 percent, followed closely by Hewlett-Packard with 27.6 percent. Dell and Sun in light of IDC´s figures come in third and fourth, with 10.8 and 9.9 percent respectively.

Whereas Dell's server revenue grew year over year by just under 17 percent, Sun's revenue increased a meager 2.7 percent. In terms of worldwide server shipments HP at 30.4 percent held on to its No. 1 position, followed by Dell with 24.5 percent.

According to IDC figures market growth in the blade server segments was especially intense: Shipment increases of more than 68 percent year over year and sales revenue gains above 100 percent point to vigorous demand. With sales of 320 million euros blade servers contributed only 3.4 percent to overall quarterly server market revenue. In this segment too IBM stayed ahead with a market share of 39.2 percent, followed by HP with 35.2 and Dell with 9.4 percent.


More in Tux Machines

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

Linux Kernel News

Games for GNU/Linux

Today in Techrights