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Fedora Core 6: Beauty or Beast?

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After the usual new-release downloading frenzy died down a bit, I downloaded the 3.3 gigabyte DVD .iso image, stoked the boiler of my test PC, and put Fedora Core 6 through its paces. My mission: to determine if FC6 is suitable for production systems, or if it's better suited as a bleeding-edge testbed. This could be a wee hint:

Fedora Core is a rapidly evolving system which follows the latest technical developments. Fedora Core may not be appropriate for use in business-critical applications in your organization.

So let's keep that in mind as we embark on our Fedora Core 6 adventure. Today I'll talk about installation, and next week dig into the neat stuff you can do with FC6 after getting it up and running.

Installer Follies

I don't particularly care for reviewing the installation of a new Linux. It should be as exciting as watching paint dry— make it go, have a leisurely tea break while it works, start using the computer. With most modern Linuxes the default installation lets you can do this. Linux is the easiest operating system to install by a country mile—easier than any of the free BSDs, easier than any commercial Unix, so much easier than Windows it's worth gloating over.

Full Story.

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