Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sweden's parliament passes law against file sharing

Filed under
Web

Last Wednesday, May 25, the Swedish parliament passed a law banning the free exchange of material protected by copyright over the Internet. The law also gives holders of copyrights a legal basis to file for damages against supporters of illicit free copies via the Internet. The Swedish government passed this law, which will take effect on July 1, in order to limit the rampant uploading and downloading of music, movies, and computer games. Not only electronic entertainment is affected; photocopies of entire books are also banned – a common practice at Swedish colleges in light of the prices for the literature that students need and often find too expensive.

In addition, to further support holders of copyrights and related industries, the Swedish parliament also accepted a proposal to increase the price of blank CDs, DVDs, and cassettes for audio and video recordings considerably in order to compensate for legal private copies. The retail price of a 5GB blank DVD will now probably rise from the current 10 krones to 30, which is approximately 3.50 euros.

In a debate in parliament that preceded the vote on this new law, members underscored the right of creators of music, movies, books, and other copyrighted works to receive fair payment for their creations. "Every worker deserves fair compensation," as left-of-center MP Tasso Stafilidis put it.

Only recently, the Swedish government had expressed its agreement with industry representatives, who stated that the illicit use of copyrighted material had gotten out of hand in Sweden. As elsewhere, the entertainment industry is also posting plummeting sales figures in Sweden and believes that one of the reasons is pirating – both by professional criminals and common consumers.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel 3.4.112 LTS Has Many PowerPC, x86, HFS, and HFS+ Improvements

A couple of days ago, kernel developer Zefan Li released the one hundred twelfth maintenance build of the long-term supported Linux 3.4 kernel series for stable GNU/Linux users. Read more

Gentoo-Based Sabayon 16.05 Linux OS Switches to the Latest Linux 4.5 Kernel

Earlier today, April 29, 2016, the developers of the Gentoo-based Sabayon Linux operating system have announced the release of the respin ISO images for the month of May of 2016. Read more

Octa-core Cortex-A53 hacker SBC sells for $60

FriendlyARM’s $60, open spec “NanoPC-T3” SBC runs Android or Linux on an octa-core Cortex-A53 SoC packed with wireless and media interfaces, plus 8GB eMMC. The over-caffeinated board builders at Guangzhou, China-based FriendlyARM have shipped their highest-end hacker board yet. The NanoPC-T3 is almost identical to the NanoPC-T2 board, but swaps out the quad-core, Cortex-A9 Samsung S5P4418 SoC for a layout-compatible S5P6818 with eight Cortex-A53 cores that can be clocked dynamically from 400MHz to 1.4GHz. Last month, FriendlyARM’ unveiled an $11, quad-core NanoPi M1 single board computer with similarly open source hardware and Android and Linux software. Read more

today's leftovers