Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

World’s Fastest Supercomputer Running GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Move Over, China: U.S. Is Again Home to World's Speediest Supercomputer [Ed: In Top 500 everything runs GNU/Linux]
  • IBM's world-class Summit supercomputer gooses speed with AI abilities
  • The US again has the world's most powerful supercomputer
  • The US Again Has World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer

    Plenty of people around the world got new gadgets Friday, but one in Eastern Tennessee stands out. Summit, a new supercomputer unveiled at Oak Ridge National Lab is, unofficially for now, the most powerful calculating machine on the planet. It was designed in part to scale up the artificial intelligence techniques that power some of the recent tricks in your smartphone.

    America hasn’t possessed the world’s most powerful supercomputer since June 2013, when a Chinese machine first claimed the title. Summit is expected to end that run when the official ranking of supercomputers, from an organization called Top500, is updated later this month.

    [...]

    Summit has nearly 28,000 graphics processors made by Nvidia, alongside more than 9,000 conventional processors from IBM. Such heavy use of graphic chips is unusual for a supercomputer, and it should enable breakthroughs in deploying machine learning on tough scientific problems, says Thomas Zacharia, director of Oak Ridge National Lab. “We set out to build the world’s most powerful supercomputer,” he says, “but it's also the world’s smartest supercomputer.”

  • IBM and the DoE launch the world’s fastest supercomputer

    IBM and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) today unveiled Summit, the department’s newest supercomputer. IBM claims that Summit is currently the world’s “most powerful and smartest scientific supercomputer” with a peak performance of a whopping 200,000 trillion calculations per second. That performance should put it comfortably at the top of the Top 500 supercomputer ranking when the new list is published later this month. That would also mark the first time since 2012 that a U.S.-based supercomputer holds the top spot on that list.

    [...]

    IBM was the general contractor for Summit and the company collaborated with Nvidia, RedHat and InfiniBand networking specialists Mellanox on delivering the new machine.

Red Hat's Take

  • How Red Hat helped to build Summit, America’s top science supercomputer

    Supercomputers and scientific research tend to go hand-in-hand. Designed for solving fundamental scientific problems, such as finding a cure for cancer and harnessing fusion energy, supercomputers recently have increasingly become more open in terms of global collaboration and information exchange among researchers. Contrast this with the fact that, in the past, supercomputer designs and implementations were relatively closed, often built by a single vendor from their inventory of components. Today, this model is evolving: as science becomes more accessible by a global community, supercomputers are becoming much more open via vendor collaboration.

"Summit servers are running Red Hat Enterprise Linux."

IBM Unveils Summit, the World's Fastest Supercomputer (For Now)

US Makes The World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer “Summit”: Power

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler. Read more

This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a “C-SKY Linux Development Board” for $5.60 and up, featuring a RISC-V derived, 574MHz C-SKY GX6605S CK610M SoC, 64MB DDR2, an HDMI port, and 2x USB 2.0 ports. Last month, Hangzhou C-SKY Microsystems Co. announced Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel support for its new RISC-V based C-SKY CK810 SoC design. Now, Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a development board that runs Linux on a similar CK610M SoC. The C-SKY Linux Development Board sells for 39-40 Yuan ($5.60 to $7.05) on Taobao and $19.50 to $21.50 on AliExpress. Read more