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Review of Slackware 11.0

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Slack

Slackware is one of the oldest Linux distributions alive today and focuses on stability over cutting edge features. You might not find many flashy GUI tools for Slackware, but don't let that fool you - this is one heck of a distro. Today I'm taking a look at this latest version of Slackware and explore the myth that Slackware isn't for newbies.

I have shrunk the Windows XP MCE partition that the laptop came with to the smallest possible size. This gives about 90GB free space for the test distro's to play with.

With version 11, this is the first version that has officially been available on DVD which simplifies the install process somewhat. CD ISO's are still available, of course, as are disks from the official Slackware store. As with any distro, I recommend that you purchase an official copy to support the developers who donate countless hours of work to product such a good product. You can purchase a subscription to Slackware which will automatically send you the latest official version when it's released - that's the method that I personally prefer.

Full Story.

Great review!

You have to be careful about that "text-based installer" comment. That's the one comment that torques me off more than any other made about Slackware... ncurses IS a gui, albeit a somewhat limited one. I find it very intuitive, and it gives me something to sit there and look at while it installs. A quick glance tells me when it needs me... unlike many installers, which look the same whether it's installing networking, partitioning your hard drive, overwriting your MBR without asking, or choking on something.

It's nice to see an article that isn't "Ubuntu r0x0rz!" every once in a while.

The BEST

The differences between Slackware and other distros only give points for the first. The BSD is by far better than SysV init. The KDE placed to /opt directory, .tgz packages instead of .deb and .rpm, pkgtool, packages completed and not those pack-dev, pack-libs, pack-themes, pack-pack, and more.

Slackware has also kernel 2.6.xx series, the good and better Xorg 6.9, and not include fancy annoying stuff.. the installer uses a GUI interface, ncurses is GUI, and is very easy.

I have to developer for two distributions here, my own distro which is based on Slackware (EASY), and another based on Debian, and I know the differences... Sometimes I wish kill myself to developer anything for Debian based distro.

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