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Linux: NOVA Filesystem, Systemd 239, LF Deep Learning Foundation

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Linux
  • New NOVA Filesystem

    Andiry Xu (working with Lu Zhang, Steven Swanson and others) posted patches for a new filesystem called NOVA (NOn-Volatile memory Accelerated). Normal RAM chips are wiped every time you turn off your computer. Non-volatile RAM retains its data across reboots. Their project targeted byte-addressable non-volatile memory chips, such as Intel's 3DXpoint DIMMs. Andiry said that the current incarnation of their code was able to do a lot already, but they still had a big to-do list, and they wanted feedback from the kernel people.

    Theodore Y. Ts'o gave the patches a try, but he found that they wouldn't even compile without some fixes, which he posted in reply. Andiry said they'd adapt those fixes into their patches.

    The last time NOVA made an appearance on the kernel mailing list was August 2017, when Steven made a similar announcement. This time around, they posted a lot more patches, including support for SysFS controls, Kconfig compilation options and a significant amount of documentation.

  • Systemd 239 Is Being Prepped For Release With Many Changes

    Systemd developers have begun wrangling the v239 release together. Among the features coming are a change where the network interface device naming may now be different (though it seems to primarily affect SR-IOV/NPAR situations), support for using the RestrictNamespaces property multiple times, the sd-boot systemd boot functionality has new configuration settings so you can turn off Windows/macOS partition discovery, sd-boot should now pick a better screen resolution when booting a HiDPI system, systemd-resolve has been renamed to resolvectl, a NoNewPrivileges property has been added to turn off acquiring of new privileges system-wide, swap files should now work for hibernation now, networkd now automatically uses the kernel's route expiration feature, documentation improvements, and many other changes.

  • LF Deep Learning Foundation Announces Project Contribution Process

    I am very pleased to announce that the LF Deep Learning Foundation has approved a project lifecycle and contribution process to enable the contribution, support and growth of artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects. With these documents in place, the LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

    The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a community umbrella project of The Linux Foundation with the mission of supporting artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects, is working to build a self-sustaining ecosystem of projects. Having a clear roadmap for how to contribute projects is a first step. Contributed projects operate under their own technical governance with collaboration resources allocated and provided by the LF Deep Learning Foundation’s Governing Board. Membership in the LF Deep Learning Foundation is not required to propose a project contribution.

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