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Security: Permissions, Misconfigured ADB, and Microsoft Neglect

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Security
  • Work a command-line interface in Linux with these permissions and prompts

    The command-line interface is an integral part of the Linux management environment. With sudo permissions and remote connectivity, working with a command line is easy.

  • Android Devices With Misconfigured ADB, a Ripe Target for Cryptojacking Malware

    Poorly configured Android devices, where the Android Debug Bridge is left enabled, have become an attractive target for hackers. According to researchers, adversaries are using the common misconfiguration to install cryptojacking malware on a wide selection of Android-based IoT devices ranging from maritime computer systems, TVs, DVRs and some mobile phone models.

    Android Debug Bridge (ADB) is an Android OS developer function that, when enabled, allows remote users to access a Unix shell to conduct command line device maintenance. According to researcher Kevin Beaumont, thousands of Android type devices ship with ADB enabled, allowing hackers to remotely access them.

  • Microsoft reveals which Windows bugs it might decide not to fix

    The Register sometimes hears from security researchers who feel that Microsoft has not responded to bug reports with appropriate haste. This document and its eventual finalised successor should help to explain such incidents to researchers. It’s also of interest to end-users because by explaining bugs that Microsoft won’t rush to fix it offers some more detail about the risks that come with running Windows.

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Get started with Roland, a random selection tool for the command line

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way. Here's the seventh of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019. Read more

Nginx vs Apache: Which Serves You Best in 2019?

For two decades Apache held sway over the web server market which is shrinking by the day. Not only has Nginx caught up with the oldest kid on the block, but it is currently the toast of many high traffic websites. Apache users might disagree here. That is why one should not jump to conclusions about which web server is better. The truth is that both form the core of complete web stacks (LAMP and LEMP), and the final choice boils down to individual needs. For instance, people running Drupal websites often call on Apache, whereas WordPress users seem to favor Nginx as much if not more. Accordingly, our goal is to help you understand your own requirements better rather than providing a one-size recommendation. Having said that, the following comparison between the two gives an accurate picture. Read more

Security: Updates, 'Smart' Things, Android Proprietary Software and Firefox Woes on Windows

  • Security updates for Friday
  • How Do You Handle Security in Your Smart Devices?
    Look around your daily life and that of your friends and family, and you’ll see that smart devices are beginning to take over our lives. But this also means an increase in a need for security, though not everyone realizes it, as discussed in a recent article on our IoT-related site. Are you aware of the need for security even when it’s IoT-related? How do you handle security in your smart devices?
  • A Vulnerability in ES File Explorer Exposes All of Your Files to Anyone on the Same Network
  • 2018 Roundup: Q1
    One of our major pain points over the years of dealing with injected DLLs has been that the vendor of the DLL is not always apparent to us. In general, our crash reports and telemetry pings only include the leaf name of the various DLLs on a user’s system. This is intentional on our part: we want to preserve user privacy. On the other hand, this severely limits our ability to determine which party is responsible for a particular DLL. One avenue for obtaining this information is to look at any digital signature that is embedded in the DLL. By examining the certificate that was used to sign the binary, we can extract the organization of the cert’s owner and include that with our crash reports and telemetry. In bug 1430857 I wrote a bunch of code that enables us to extract that information from signed binaries using the Windows Authenticode APIs. Originally, in that bug, all of that signature extraction work happened from within the browser itself, while it was running: It would gather the cert information on a background thread while the browser was running, and include those annotations in a subsequent crash dump, should such a thing occur.