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Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited, Chromebooks' GNU/Linux Experience Improves

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Linux
  • Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited

    One Cause at a Time revisits the advantages - and experiences - working with a Linux-powered laptop...

  • Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

    It really seems that Chrome OS is being groomed to be the one OS that runs them all. Well almost all. In addition to its native Chrome-based platform, it now supports Android through Google Play Store and, just recently, Linux. Because of those two, it is also possible to run Windows programs to some extent. CodeWeavers, which develops software for running Windows programs on Mac and Linux, has just shown what could be a better way to run those same programs on a Chromebook.

  • Upcoming Chrome OS Files ‘refresh’ highlights Android, Linux files w/ redesigned navigation

    Earlier this month, Google began testing a way to surface files created by Android apps in the Chrome OS Files application. Given upcoming Linux support, the company is now planning a broader “Navigation UI Refresh” for how users view and manage files in Chrome OS.

    This “Refresh” — currently targeted for Chrome OS 69 — is centered on the navigation drawer of the Files app. At the moment, this list of folders is cluttered and becoming increasingly so in light of Android apps and soon Linux software generating user-created files, like PDFs, images, and more.

  • Chromebook Files app getting revamped to better organize Android and Linux apps

    Chrome OS has got a ton of love from Google lately. We’re seeing the OS gain native support for Linux apps starting with the Google Pixelbook and the Samsung Chromebook Plus, and possibly the upcoming Acer Chromebook 13 and Acer Chromebook Spin 13. The interface is also receiving touch optimizations for tablets and detachables like the HP Chromebook X2 and Acer Chromebook Tab 10. Then there’s the Google Material Theme revamp that’s in testing. Now, it seems that the Chromebook Files app will be getting some major structural changes to help users keep track of all their Downloads, Google Drive files, Android apps, Linux apps, and more.

  • Chrome OS Getting Better Organization For Linux/Android Apps

    Chrome OS is getting better organization for Linux and Android apps in the near future by way of an improvement to the Files app on Chromebooks. The improvement is coming via some changes to the app that Google is currently in the process of working on and eventually implementing so that it can push the changes out to users. The rework of sorts will see a new file tree show up in the app labeled as “my files,” under which users will be able to see Linux Files and Linux Drive under their own sub-menu that is separate from the Android apps.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • First results of the ROSIN project: Robotics Open-Source Software for Industry
    Open-Source Software for robots is a de-facto standard in academia, and its advantages can benefit industrial applications as well. The worldwide ROS-Industrial initiative has been using ROS, the Robot Operating System, to this end. In order to consolidate Europe’s expertise in advanced manufacturing, the H2020 project ROSIN supports EU’s strong role within ROS-Industrial. It will achieve this goal through three main actions on ROS: ensuring industrial-grade software quality; promoting new business-relevant applications through so-called Focused Technical Projects (FTPs); supporting educational activities for students and industry professionals on the one side conducting ROS-I trainings as well as and MOOCs and on the other hand by supporting education at third parties via Education Projects (EPs).
  • Baidu To Launch World’s First Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems Open Source Solution By End Of 2018
    Baidu Inc. has announced it will launch the Apollo Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems (IVICS) open-source solution by the end of 2018, leveraging its capabilities in autonomous driving to bring together intelligent vehicles and infrastructure to form a “human-vehicle-roadway” interplay – an important step toward developing future intelligent transportation.
  • Versity Open Sources Next Generation Archiving Filesystem
    The ScoutFS project was started in 2016 to address the rapidly growing demand for larger POSIX namespaces and faster metadata processing. The design goal for ScoutFS includes the ability to store up to one trillion files in a single namespace by efficiently distributing metadata handling across a scale out cluster of commodity compute nodes.
  • Moving from Wordpress
  • Epic Clock Clocks The Unix Epoch
    Admit it: when you first heard of the concept of the Unix Epoch, you sat down with a calculator to see when exactly 2³¹-1 seconds would be from midnight UTC on January 1, 1970. Personally, I did that math right around the time my company hired contractors to put “Y2K Suspect” stickers on every piece of equipment that looked like it might have a computer in it, so the fact that the big day would come sometime in 2038 was both comforting and terrifying. [Forklift] is similarly entranced by the idea of the Unix Epoch and built a clock to display it, at least for the next 20 years or so. Accommodating the eventual maximum value of 2,147,483,647, plus the more practical ISO-8601 format, required a few more digits than the usual clock – sixteen to be exact. The blue seven-segment displays make an impression in the sleek wooden case, about which there is sadly no detail in the build log. But the internals are well documented, and include a GPS module and an RTC. The clock parses the NMEA time string from the satellites and syncs the RTC. There’s a brief video below of the clock in action.
  • 3 top Python libraries for data science
    Python's many attractions—such as efficiency, code readability, and speed—have made it the go-to programming language for data science enthusiasts. Python is usually the preferred choice for data scientists and machine learning experts who want to escalate the functionalities of their applications. (For example, Andrey Bulezyuk used the Python programming language to create an amazing machine learning application.) Because of its extensive usage, Python has a huge number of libraries that make it easier for data scientists to complete complicated tasks without many coding hassles. Here are the top 3 Python libraries for data science; check them out if you want to kickstart your career in the field.
  • PortableCL 1.2 Still Coming While POCL 1.3 Will Further Improve Open-Source OpenCL
    It's been a number of months since last having any major news to report on POCL, the "PortableCL" project providing a portable OpenCL/compute implementation that can run on CPUs, select GPUs, and other accelerators. POCL 1.1 from March remains the current stable release while POCL 1.2 has been in the release candidate stage. The POCL 1.2 release candidates began last month with a few highlights like LLVM 7.0 support, device-side printf support, and HWLOC 2.0 library support.

New CloudBees Suite Addresses DevOps Gaps in Software Delivery

CloudBees is bringing a set of products into a new CloudBees Suite that it said will help companies of all sizes streamline the software development process. The new software is set to be announced Sept. 18 at the company’s DevOps World / Jenkins World conference in San Francisco. Jenkins is the open-source version of CloudBees, which is a commercial offering. A central piece of the CloudBees Suite is the CloudBees Core for unified governance of continuous delivery operations and processes used in DevOps. Software pipelines can also use Core to run software pipelines more efficiently in a self-managed way in the cloud or on-premises. Read more Also: CloudBees Announces Availability of Support for Jenkins Open Source

Chrome's Latest

Everything Is File In Linux - Part 1

Divided into 2 parts, in this first part I will introduce the concept that everything is file and present the special devices / dev / null, / dev / zero, / dev / random and / dev / full. Part 2 will be to present didactically interesting features about this, for example, how to turn a file into a partition! Read
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