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Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited, Chromebooks' GNU/Linux Experience Improves

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GNU
Linux
  • Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited

    One Cause at a Time revisits the advantages - and experiences - working with a Linux-powered laptop...

  • Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

    It really seems that Chrome OS is being groomed to be the one OS that runs them all. Well almost all. In addition to its native Chrome-based platform, it now supports Android through Google Play Store and, just recently, Linux. Because of those two, it is also possible to run Windows programs to some extent. CodeWeavers, which develops software for running Windows programs on Mac and Linux, has just shown what could be a better way to run those same programs on a Chromebook.

  • Upcoming Chrome OS Files ‘refresh’ highlights Android, Linux files w/ redesigned navigation

    Earlier this month, Google began testing a way to surface files created by Android apps in the Chrome OS Files application. Given upcoming Linux support, the company is now planning a broader “Navigation UI Refresh” for how users view and manage files in Chrome OS.

    This “Refresh” — currently targeted for Chrome OS 69 — is centered on the navigation drawer of the Files app. At the moment, this list of folders is cluttered and becoming increasingly so in light of Android apps and soon Linux software generating user-created files, like PDFs, images, and more.

  • Chromebook Files app getting revamped to better organize Android and Linux apps

    Chrome OS has got a ton of love from Google lately. We’re seeing the OS gain native support for Linux apps starting with the Google Pixelbook and the Samsung Chromebook Plus, and possibly the upcoming Acer Chromebook 13 and Acer Chromebook Spin 13. The interface is also receiving touch optimizations for tablets and detachables like the HP Chromebook X2 and Acer Chromebook Tab 10. Then there’s the Google Material Theme revamp that’s in testing. Now, it seems that the Chromebook Files app will be getting some major structural changes to help users keep track of all their Downloads, Google Drive files, Android apps, Linux apps, and more.

  • Chrome OS Getting Better Organization For Linux/Android Apps

    Chrome OS is getting better organization for Linux and Android apps in the near future by way of an improvement to the Files app on Chromebooks. The improvement is coming via some changes to the app that Google is currently in the process of working on and eventually implementing so that it can push the changes out to users. The rework of sorts will see a new file tree show up in the app labeled as “my files,” under which users will be able to see Linux Files and Linux Drive under their own sub-menu that is separate from the Android apps.

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