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Graphics: Wayland, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) by Intel Inside Linux, and VFIO Drivers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland's Weston 5.0 Moved Up To An August Release

    Following the recent discussions of moving Wayland's Weston compositor to a 4-month release schedule and possibly doing away with time-based Wayland releases itself, Weston 5.0 will now be coming out in August.

    Feature development on Weston is as busy as ever while Wayland (libwayland) is quite mature and not seeing too much churn. Upstream Wayland developers now appear to be in agreement to carrying out the next Weston release at least on a four-month release cycle.

  • Librem 5 progress report #14

    On the nuts and bolts level, our phone shell (phosh) has seen several usability improvements mostly around the lockscreen. One important change is that the lockscreen unlocking has been switched to PAM to better handle the PIN to lock the device. There have also been some additions to the code to better handle multiple outputs (screens). Also, Libhandy is our “handy” UI library for developing GTK+ apps. There has been a recent addition of an arrows widget (HdyArrows) to indicate swiping direction which will be very useful to many applications, especially the lockscreen. Additionally, libhandy has seen some bug fixes and a slight rework of the keyboard handling support. Since graphics are important, we have added Etnaviv support to weston-simple-dmabuf (a Wayland client to test Linux DMA-BUF protocol implementations). We also extended it’s NV12 format support. It’s being used over here to test wlroot’s linux-dmabuf implementation which we wrote a couple of weeks ago. We’d like to especially thank the wlroots and Weston projects for their code reviews, recommendations, and support.

  • Librem 5 Continues Working On Its Wayland Software Stack, Testing Vibration Motors, Chargers

    Purism has published their latest progress report on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux-powered smartphone that they still hope to begin shipping next January.

  • Intel Developers Working On HDCP Content Protection Protocol For Wayland [Ed: This is basically “Linux Vista”. First Web DRM (EME). Now LF sells out as well.]

    With Intel's DRM kernel driver now supporting HDCP for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection with work done by Intel and Google developers, there is now work underway for allowing HDCP to work in a Wayland-based environment.

    As with the work done on the Direct Rendering Manager side, these Wayland patches aren't enforcing any restrictions on users by itself but is simply making the support available should any applications come along that wish to enforce HDCP usage on the Linux desktop.

  • VFIO Adds Sample Mediated Device Display Drivers

    The VFIO framework that allows exposing direct device access to user-space in a secure, IOMMU-protected fashion is gaining some new sample drivers in Linux 4.18.

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Security Leftovers

  • Major 9.8 vulnerability affects multiple Linux kernels— CVE-2019-8912 (af_alg_release())
    Our assessment is that the cause is this commit, the introduction of a "sockfs_setattr()" function. This function neglects to null-out values in a structure, making their values usable after exiting from the function (a so-called ‘use-after-free’ error).
  • Linux use-after-free vulnerability found in Linux 2.6 through 4.20.11
    Last week, a Huawei engineer reported a vulnerability present in the early Linux 2.6 kernels through version 4.20.11. The Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN) that detects dynamic memory errors within the Linux kernel code was used to uncover the use-after-free vulnerability which was present since early Linux versions. The use-after-free issue was found in the networking subsystem’s sockfs code and could lead to arbitrary code execution as a result.
  • Taking Care of Your Personal Online Security (For Paranoids)
    So, use Linux, and preferably coreboot or Libreboot (open source BIOS). You can buy hardware based on the recommendations of well-known and respected (still a bit paranoid) cypherpunk Richard Stallman.
  • Why do PAM projects fail? Tales from the trenches
    Privileged accounts hold the keys to highly sensitive company information and once these credentials are targeted, they can easily lead to a breach of a company’s most valuable assets; from databases to social media and unstructured data. Most enterprises have implemented some form of Privileged Access Management (PAM), but many find these initiatives fail to live up to expectations. Below are some common reasons why a PAM project might fail to meet the initial expectations; coupled with practical insights on how to prevent it from becoming a dud.
  • Sailfish OS: Security and Data Privacy
    Mobile World Congress is back again! Like every single year during the Jolla journey, we are excited to take part in this event. We have had great experiences in the past MWC’s, our main drivers for attending are the current and relevant topics discussed during the congress. One of this year’s core themes is Digital Trust; “Digital trust analyses the growing responsibilities required to create the right balance with consumers, governments and regulators.” It makes us happy that these topics are being discussed, especially since several scandals have recently affected trust in digital solutions. At Jolla we work constantly towards providing a secure and transparent solution. Our value towards our customer’s privacy is reflected in our values and actions. Back in May of 2018 our CEO Sami Pienimäki wrote a blog post on the GDPR laws passed within the European Union and stated the cornerstones on how Jolla views data privacy. This stand on privacy is not rocket science – the core idea is to respect our customers’ privacy and allow them to be in control of their data.
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Which is More Secure: Windows, Linux, or macOS? [Ed: security is not an OS feature but a separate product, insists company that sells "security" as a proprietar ysoftware product]

Games: BATTLETECH, Tesla vs Lovecraft and More

Linux Foundation, Linux 5.0 and Linux 5.1

  • Certified danger
    I suspected Linux Foundation went to the dark side when they started strange deals with Microsoft. But I'm pretty sure they went to dark side now.
  • The Most Interesting Highlights To The Linux 5.0 Kernel
    With the Linux 5.0 kernel due out within the next week or two, here's a look back at the biggest end-user facing changes for this kernel release that started out as Linux 4.21.
  • AMDGPU Squeezes In Revised Context Priority Handling For Linux 5.1
    With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle soon to kick-off, an early batch of fixes for the AMDGPU DRM driver and other fixes were sent in on Thursday to queue along with all of the new functionality being staged in DRM-Next. There's a lot of DRM improvements and throughout all the kernel subsystems of new material queuing up for Linux 5.1. On the AMDGPU side there is AMDGPU DC seamless boot bits, PCI Express bandwidth utilization is now exported to user-space, Vega power management updates, DCC support for scanout surfaces, better page-flipping in DC, and various Vega 20 fixes.

Videos: Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon, Bash Commands and FLOSS Weekly With ClearlyDefined

  • Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon Run Through
    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon.
  • JC’s Favorite BASH Commands
    We chill and look at some cool commands for the BASH terminal and scripts.
  • FLOSS Weekly 518: Clearly Defined
    Carol Smith is the program manager for ClearlyDefined, a project under the Open Source Initiative. ClearlyDefined is an open source project to crowd-source the gathering, curation, and upstreaming of licensing and security (and more) data about free and open source projects.