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Microsoft loves Linux so much its R Open install script rm'd /bin/sh

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Microsoft
Debian

Microsoft had to emit a hasty update for its R Open analysis tool after developers found the open-source package was not playing nice with some Linux systems.

The issue was brought to light earlier this week by developer Norbert Preining, who found that the Debian GNU/Linux version of Open R – Microsoft's open-source implementation of the R statistics and data science tool – was causing headaches when it was installed on some systems.

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Also: Microsoft Fixes Faulty Debian Package That Messed With Users' Settings

More in Tux Machines

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

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    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back. The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0. Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."
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Security: Cincoze Back Doors (ME), Windows 10 Mobile Killed (No More Patches), New FUD About 'Linux Servers'

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GNU/Linux Gains on Laptops

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