Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

openSUSE 10.2(r1) RELEASE-NOTES.en.html

openSUSE 10.2 Release Notes

Copyright© 2006 Novell, Inc.

The release notes are under constant development. Download the newest version during the Internet test or refer to http://www.suse.com/relnotes/i386/SUSE-Linux/10.1.1/RELEASE-NOTES.en.html.

These release notes cover the following areas:

  • General: Information that everybody should read.

  • Update: Changes that are not mentioned in the Start-Up Manual, Chapter 2.

  • Technical: This section contains a number of technical changes and enhancements for the experienced user.

In the Start-Up Manual, find information about installation and basic system configuration. In the Reference Guide, the system configuration is explained in detail. Additionally, the most important applications are described in the GNOME and KDE User Guide.

General

New Software Management Tools: zypper and opensuseupdater

10.2 also introduces a new set of light-weight software management tools to be used even without the ZENWorks Management Deamon (ZMD) running:

  • The zypper command line tool is software managment tool. Besides managing updates as offered from the update server it can also install or deinstall regular packages. Find more information in the zypper man page.

  • The opensuseupdater is a desktop applet that helps you monitoring available software updates and install them easily or automatically, if wanted.

Changes with Firefox 2

Switch from Firefox version 1.5 to version 2 is a major update. Find detailed update information in the official release notes at http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/2.0/releasenotes/. Note the following changes:

  • Some themes and extensions from Firefox 1.5 will not work with Firefox 2.0 anymore and need to be updated.

  • Default keybindings are changed. For example, backspace does no longer take you back in history, it will now scroll up the page. You can change it by opening the location about:config. The value of the configuration key browser.backspace_action needs to be changed from 1 (default) to 0.

New wodim Package to Write Optical Disk Media (CD-ROM/DVD)

The "cdrecord" package has been dropped from the distribution. The new "wodim" package can be used to record data or audio Compact Discs on an Orange Book CD recorder or to write DVD media on a DVD recorder.

Alternatively use "growisofs" for writing DVDs. The graphical front-ends handle this transparently.

The OpenSync Synchronization Framework

For synchronizing mobile device the OpenSync suite replaces multisync. For more information, read the "Mobility" part of the Reference manual.

Add-On Medium with Additional Languages

Include the language add-on medium in your list of installation sources, if you want better support for one of our tier 2 languages. Tier 2 languages are all but the tier 1 languages (English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, simplified and traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Czech). Support for tier 1 languages is available on the standard media set.

Update

Configuration of CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System)

The update of CUPS from version 1.1 to 1.2 carries incompatible changes. It is not possible to convert the printer configuration from the previous CUPS versions automatically. Use the YaST printer setup ("Hardware" -> "Printer") to reconfigure the printing system.

For reference, check the save configuration files:

/etc/cups/classes.conf.rpmsave

/etc/cups/printers.conf.rpmsave

Technical

The Standard Kernel

The kernel-default package contains the standard kernel for both uniprocessor and multiprocessor systems. The kernel comes with SMP support and runs with only minimal overhead on uniprocessor systems. There is no kernel-smp package anymore.

The New Default File System: ext3

The YaST partitioner now defaults to create new file systems using the ext3 type replacing reiserfs. The ext3 file system is known for its backward compatibility with the ext2 file system.

The high performance directory hashing option is enabled by default. This feature uses hashed b-trees to locate directory entries. By not requiring the entire directory to be read, this accelerates lookups in large directories dramatically. Although it is not recommended, the administrator can disable this feature by removing the "dir_index" option in the YaST partitioner.

Setting Up LVM and EVMS with YaST

Experts can now rely on YaST for configuring LVM (Logical Volume Manager) and EVMS (Enterprise Volume Management). Find detailed information in the Reference manual, Chapter "Advanced Disk Setup".

SMART Disk Monitoring Daemon (smartd)

The SMART Disk Monitoring Daemon (smartd) now also supports SATA hard disks without the "-d ata" switch. Status notification happens via powersavenotify. smartd is not enabled by default. To enable it, start the YaST runlevel editor ("System" -> "System Services (Runlevel)") and check smartd service.

For more information, see the smartd man page.

BIOS RAID Supported During Installation

BIOS RAID is now supported during installation. Activate it in the BIOS and run a default installation.

X.Org Specific Changes for Developers

The X.Org system is installed in /usr. Adjust your programs if needed. If you are referencing fonts by directory names like XEP, find the new directories now in /usr/share/fonts.

New Power Management Options

The suspend framework switched from powersavedpm-utils. This switch makes many configuration options in /etc/powersave/sleep obsolete. Instead configure suspend in /etc/pm/config now. For more information, refer to http://en.opensuse.org/Pm-utils.


More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more