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GIMP 2.10.4 Released

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GNU

The latest update of GIMP’s new stable series delivers bugfixes, simple horizon straightening, async fonts loading, fonts tagging, and more new features.

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More GIMP Coverage

  • Image Editor GIMP 2.10.4 Brings Async Fonts Loading, Simple Horizon Straightening

    GIMP, the free and open source raster graphics editor, was updated to version 2.10.4. With this release, the image editor includes async fonts loading, simple horizon straightening, and more.

    With GIMP 2.10.4, fonts are loaded asynchronous, which results in a much faster startup time. As a result of this change, some fonts may not be ready when GIMP starts so if you want to use the text tool as soon as the GIMP window shows up, some fonts may not be available. GIMP lets you know if that's the case though. Non-text related activities can be performed right away.

    Another change in this GIMP release is the addition of a (auto) Straighten button in the Measure tool settings dialog:

El Reg Also

  • GIMP masks font downloads, adds horizon fix in new build

    As the US partied and the UK made increasingly desperate “well, we dumped YOU” jokes, the GIMP team celebrated 4 July by emitting a fresh stable build of the arty application with a function aimed at fixing drunken photos.

    The latest stable release of GIMP (2.10.4) sees the introduction of the nifty Straighten button as part of the Measure tool, which will automatically rotate an image after the user has measured just how wonky the horizon ended up after a particularly spirited photo session.

    Other features in the release include a potential end to staring at a screen during start-up while a seemingly endless parade of fonts load. GIMP now loads the things in a parallel process (the only question is why it took so long for this feature to make an appearance,) along with tagging of fonts and some widgets to show how GIMP is using computer memory. Or leaking, as the case may be.

Joey Sneddon's Coverage

  • GIMP 2.10.4 Released with Faster Start Up Times, Auto-Straighten Tool

    GIMP 2.10.4 is the fourth minor release of the editor since the GIMP 2.10 arrived back in May and is packed with major improvements.

    [...]

    Another font-related change in this release is the ability to tag fonts in the same manner as gradients, brushes and patterns.

    As mentioned, I have a tonne of fonts on my system (I make a lot of banners and graphics for this site, and don’t like things to look “samey”) and font tagging allow me to label them based on style or tone, e.g., “comic book”, “thin”, “official company fonts”, for faster finding later.

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