Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Another Sabayon Linux 3.2 Look (from a non-Gentoo user)

Filed under
Linux

My background over the years has largely been with Mandrake/Mandriva Linux, and it's fully grown and mature (no longer a child), PCLinuxOS. Yes, I've dabbled with several other distributions along the way, but I always return to these two (Mandriva on the server, PCLinuxOS on the desktop).

I don't know a whole lot about Sabayon/Gentoo's command line package manager Portage, and the relatively recent GUI front end to it called Kuroo. So, if I do continue with this distribution (and I think I will), I'm going to have to do some learning after all.

Although there will be some overlap, I will try to not repeat the material in Rob Williams excellent review (which is linked to from tuxmachines main page).

Although you can run Sabayon Linux as a Live CD, I went directly to installing Sabayon Linux X86_64 on my main test machine. Sabayon Linux uses a modified version of the Red Hat Anaconda installer, and you get a choice of Text or GUI Installation. I chose the GUI install, and away I went. If you have an NVidia Graphic video card, X starts up with the latest NVidia binary drivers. (Yes, I know, many folks will not like that Sabayon Linux contains NVidia's closed drivers). You have your choice of desktop during install: KDE, Gnome, XFCE, Enlightenment 16, and Fluxbox Geeky. I chose KDE. The installation process was completely trouble free.

After installation, the first boot of Sabayon Linux was impressive--everything worked. I have no unusual devices on my test box--but I do have an older 15-inch LCD Monitor that is very fussy about sync rates. I usually have to start up in console mode and edit the xorg.conf file to get X-windows to start. Not this time. I plugged in (at separate times) a PS2 connected keyboard, and a USB keyboard on this box--both work great. Sound works. Networking works. USB flash drives work. This is dead simple stuff.

Sabayon Linux graphics are orange, yellow, and black--and are not to my taste. So I proceed to "blueify" my machine. I read up a bit on the emerge command, and install my favorite KDE windows decoration style (ThinKeramik), and my favorite widget style.

The Sabayon Linux start button in the KDE Panel brings up the SUSE menu structure. Not my cup of tea at all, but if you right click on it, you get a popup menu choice that includes "Switch to KDE Menu Style". I do so, and I get the the K-icon and a standard KDE menu system. I install some of my favorite wallpapers into /usr/kde/share/wallpapers, and adjust my desktop accordingly.

I have rarely found Linux distros that have fonts that look as good as those on Mandriva/PCLinuxOS, and Sabayon's fonts don't. I fuss with different fonts and antialiasing, and finally arrive at fonts that are adequate.

So with basic eye-candy stuff settled, time to try the fancy AIGLX or XGL desktop acceleration effects. In the KDE menu system, under the "Settings" menu choice, there are three programs that affect this:

  • Acceleration Manager - This is where you select your Desktop Acceleration Mode
    • No Desktop Acceleration
    • AIGLX Desktop Acceleration
      or
    • XGL Desktop Acceleration
    • The Acceleration Manager explains the two modes of acceleration as follows:

      • AIGLX
        Where supported, has better performance than XGL and uses less memory. It is the best choice for performance and stability.
      • XGL
        XGL is more compatible with ATI Graphics Cards than AIGLX, but it is slower, does not support Dual Monitor nor OpenGL games on top of itself.
  • Beryl Settings Manager - This is where you tie the various acceleration effects to keyboard and mouse control. The degree of customization and number of effects is breathtaking.
  • Emerald Theme Manager - And here, you can select a theme for your window decorations that are applied in accelerated mode.

So, what's my take on this? It's getting very close to the time when you can live in AIGLX all the time. Under AIGLX, I note a very slight degradation in the fonts (almost not noticable unless you are looking for it), and GLX based games run a little slower. I like the rotating cube as a desktop organizer, and it is somewhat integrated into the 1-4 KDE 1-4 desktop choices in the panel. With the three programs, Sabayon makes it easy to switch on and off, and easy to configure and customize.

Sabayon Linux specific documentation on their web site is sparse and incomplete. To continue much furthur with this distro, I'll have to go to the Gentoo web site. However, KDE's "Konversation" IRC chat program appears on the desktop by default (named "Get Live Help") for some real time assistance.

Despite the sparse documentation and the not so great fonts, I'm very impressed with Sabayon Linux 3.2. Its performance and flexibility are excellent, and the DVD comes with a wide range of software. I encourage everyone to give it a try--even if you have never have tried Gentoo.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

I liked it too, but ...

I actually installed 3.05 and, again, opted for Kde. Now, I would choose Xfce. I also have been a Mandriva user, now PCLinuxOS.

I installed the 64 bit version and thereafter found compiling software quite a chore. The installed Firefox would not launch so I unemerged it and somehow emerged a different version which launched. I could not complete an emerge of OpenOffice.

I also was unimpressed by the fonts. The main issue for me, however, was the sheer amount of time involved in the process of adding software. I just did not have the dedication to persevere in the face of repeated failures.

For seekers only

RE: I liked it too, but

If you're referring to the 3.0b version in your post, version 3.2 is greatly improved. Yes, when you install new software, it does take a great deal of time to both download and compile and install. That's simply the intent of a Gentoo Linux based distribution.

I was surprised, however, at the sheer number of packages installed from the DVD, so Sabayon Linux 3.2 doesn't lack for much.

Since I'm a high school computer science teacher, I downloaded and installed all the Ruby programming language packages with emerge (I teach Ruby to my beginning Programming students). That wasn't too bad.

I downloaded the most recent 64-bit OpenOffice.org release from Pavel Janik's ftp openoffice site as a compressed RPM. Sabayon does have rpm on it, and OpenOffice.org 2.1 installed and ran great.

I do hope they spiff up the fonts in the next release.

Great review!

I agree with you gfranken completely. The theme is not for everyone. Maybe they should include a darker colored theme in addition to please everyone. Of course it's not too difficult to do it by yourself, but they do a quality job on their themes...

"Gentoo made easy" is not a common slogan, but it is for Sabayon. Even though it's based on that distro, it's an easier way to learn the ins and outs, instead of downloading Gentoo proper and diving in heads first.

I think SL is going to grow, it's a very polished OS.

RE: Great review!

Thanks for the kind words. As a non Gentoo user I couldn't go into much more depth. Sabayon Linux 3.2 is one of the few distros in the last few years I've left on a machine for more than a couple of days.

I do intend to do a genuine Gentoo install next Summer, just for my own learning and edification.

Yes, SL well deserves a look from anyone testing distros.

help

I AM USING MS WINDOWS XP FOR 3YEARS. BUT LAST WEEK I GOT A CD OF SUSE LINUX. THEN I AM INTRESTED IN LINUX SO I COLLECTED NINE LINUX, LAST ONE I GOT WAS SABAYON 3.26 , ITS REALLY WONDERFULL AND AMAZING. NOW I AM USING SABAYON IN MY DESKTOP AND IN MY LAPTOP. BUT I CANNOT CONNECT TO INTERNET USING MY DIAL UP MODEM. I THING ITS THE ONLY DRAWBACK. IT HAVE HIGH PERFORMENCE IN MULTIMEDIA. BUT TO FULLFILL MY NEED I HAVE TO BE ONLINE..... PLEASE HELP TO CONNECT TO INTERNET.........

I HAVE NOKIA 6030 AND CA-45 DATACABLE CAN I CONNECT MY PHONE TO PC IN SABAYON

IF THESE TWO NEEDS ARE ARE SATISFIED I CAN REMOVE WINDOWS XP FROM MY COMPUTER

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Compact embedded system runs Linux on i.MX8M

MiTac’s fanless “ME1-108T” embedded computer runs Linux on an up to quad-core i.MX8M with up to 4GB LPDDR4, up to 32GB eMMC, 2x GbE, 3x USB, and HDMI, DP, serial, mini-PCIe, and 40-pin RPi GPIO. ICP Germany announced the launch of MiTac’s compact ME1-108T embedded system. Although we have reported on dozens of compute modules and SBCs that run Linux on NXP’s dual- or quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M, the ME1-108T appears to be only the second embedded system using the SoC after Axiomtek’s Agent336. Read more

today's howtos

  • Shading in Blender – Linux Hint

    Shading is an act of adding shade to a drawn object to give it a look and a perception of depth. Nobody likes white bland 3D objects. In 3D modeling, it is very significant to give objects some color material or texture. The process of adding shades to color materials and textures is called shading. Shading is so essential in 3D modeling that Blender has a dedicated workspace for shading. Shading workspace will automatically bring us in the “Look Dev” mode. Look Dev mode approximates lights and gives a general idea of the output of the object or scene. The shader editor will show the shader nodes of the selected object. Every object in Blender can be assigned a default material with white shading. And these shaders can be manipulated in the Shading workspace. You can add material to any object by going into the material tab.

  • Blender Viewport Navigation – Linux Hint

    The viewport is the main view of Blender that a user sees after getting it installed. At first look, it may appear intimidating, but it has become a lot comprehensible after the launch of the 2.80 version. The interface is less complicated and simple to learn. The viewport is a window that allows you to look around the scene or object you created. Viewport and camera view can be confusing, but both are not similar. A camera is an object in the scene, whereas the viewport is a part of the interface. Basics of navigating viewport include rotating, zooming, and panning the perspective of the view. There are various ways to navigate in the viewport.

  • Blender Cloud Rendering – Linux Hint

    How does it feel when you create a beautiful scene in Blender with high definition textures, shaders, particles, and volumetric effects and when you click on rendering, it just says that you need 2 hours to render just one frame? Yes, it feels discouraging. It is not easy to render a high-quality image or animation using an ordinary workstation. It is not a piece of cake to render in Blender, especially when working in Cycles (rendering engine). 3D rendering requires a lot of computing power. If you are rendering an animation, then it will take much more power and time. It would be best if you had a powerful PC with high-end specifications to get decent results. The trouble is the affordability of a robust workstation; they are costly. But this issue is fixable; just use cloud rendering.

  • Delete/Drop a Database in MySQL – Linux Hint

    MySQL is an RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) that is famous for its speed and easy-to-use interface. In this article, you will learn about the different methods to delete or drop a database in MySQL. In this article, we assume that you already have a working knowledge of the creation and listing of databases in MySQL. So, feel free to read on if you have already installed MySQL on your system and have some dummy databases in MySQL that you want to delete.

  • CentOS 8 Restart Network – Linux Hint

    Among the most frequent system administration practices is the process of restarting the network. To connect your machine with the Internet, a sound networking service is always required. At times, due to undesirable issues, the networking service in a particular operating system may start malfunctioning. If the issue is temporary, then it can be resolved simply by restarting your networking service. There are multiple methods that you can use in any operating system to restart the system’s networking service. Today, we walk you through the two primary methods of restarting the network service in CentOS 8, one of the most popular distributions of the Linux operating system. If you are using a system based on CentOS 8 and are not able to establish a secure connection with your network, you would be shocked by how many issues a quick restart can solve. You can restart the Linux networking service using various commands, but you must execute the commands to restart the network using sudo or su commands as a root user.

  • Installation of Sublime text editor on Ubuntu 20.04

    Sublime Text is a well-known text editor used to write source code for web development. This tutorial will assist you in installing Sublime Text on an Ubuntu 20.04 machine.

  • WireShark in-depth Tutorial – Linux Hint

    Wireshark is an open-source and free network traffic inspection tool. It captures and displays packets in real-time for offline analysis in a human-readable format with microscopic details. It requires some sound knowledge of basic networking and is considered an essential tool for system administrators and network security experts. Wireshark is the de-facto go-to tool for several network problems that vary from network troubleshooting, security issue examination, inspecting network traffic of a suspicious application, debugging protocol implementations, along with network protocol learning purposes, etc. The Wireshark project was initiated in 1998. Thanks to the global networking expert’s voluntary contribution, it continues to make updates for new technologies and encryption standards. Hence, it’s by far one of the best packet analyzer tools and is utilized as a standard commercial tool by various government agencies, educational institutes, and non-profit organizations.

myMPD – standalone and lightweight web-based MPD client

My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience to be present. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being with an audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the coronavirus pandemic. I’m therefore listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format, and stored locally. Linux offers a huge array of open source music players. And many of them are high quality. I’ve reviewed the vast majority for LinuxLinks, but I’m endeavoring to explore every free music player in case there’s an undiscovered gem. MPD is a powerful server-side application for playing music. In a home environment, you can connect an MPD server to a Hi-Fi system, and control the server using a notebook or smartphone. You can, of course, play audio files on remote clients. MPD can be started system-wide or on a per-user basis. myMPD is a standalone and lightweight web-based MPD client. Its developer claims myMPD is designed for minimal resource usage and requires only very few dependencies. Read more