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Linux 4.18-rc4 Kernel Released: Boring Is Good

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Linux

The fourth weekly test release of the Linux 4.18 kernel is now available.

Linux Torvalds has just announced the 4.18-rc4 kernel, which roughly marks the midpoint overall of the Linux 4.18 kernel cycle. If all goes well, the Linux 4.18 kernel will be officially out in about four or five weeks.

Things look pretty normal here, and size-wise this looks good too, so it's another of those "solid progress to release" weeks. Boring is good.

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  • Linux 4.18-rc4

    Things look pretty normal here, and size-wise this looks good too, so
    it's another of those "solid progress to release" weeks. Boring is
    good.

    About half of the updates are to drivers, with GPU and networking
    being the bulk of it, but there's some misc noise all over (PCI, SCSI,
    power management, acpi, dmaengine).

    Outside of drivers, it's networking (including some bpf fixed),
    filesystems (cifs and ext4), some core scheduler fixes, and some arch
    updatyes (x86, riscv, small other updates).

    Let's hope this release continues being quiet. But go test to make
    sure it's all working for you all,

    Linus

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