Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software and Games: Wego, Cockpit, Samba, Podman, Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week and GOG

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • wego – ASCII weather app for the terminal

    I spend an inordinate amount of time at the command line. I almost live on the command line because of its convenience. It’s probably because I love terminal apps.

    wego is another gem of a terminal application. It’s open source weather software written in the Go programming language and designed for the terminal. It displays the weather in a variety of visually attractive ways. It’s a lightweight way to keep an eye on the weather without requiring a web browser. The information is SSL-encrypted for transmission to the local computer.

    You may have been using the software without knowing it. wttr.in is a web frontend for wego that you can access using curl to provide weather information from a terminal. If you’ve already got curl on your system, there’s nothing to install. It’s got lots of options; you can find out about them from curl wttr.in/:help

  • Cockpit 172

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 172.

  • Samba 4.9 Is Working On Many Improvements, New Features

    Developers behind Samba, the open-source SMB/CIFS implementation for providing integration with the Windows Server Domain and Windows clients, is preparing for their next 4.9 release.

    In stepping towards their first preview release of Samba 4.9, their news file has been getting filled in over the past couple days to reflect all of the changes that have been staged in Samba Git since the Samba 4.9 branching at the beginning of the year.

  • Using podman for containers

    Podman is one of the newer tool in the container world, it can help you to run OCI containers in pods. It uses Buildah to build containers, and runc or any other OCI compliant runtime. Podman is being actively developed.

    I have moved the two major bots we use for dgplug summer training (named batul and tenida) under podman and they are running well for the last few days.

  • The Humble Store 'Square Enix Publisher Week' has some great Linux games on offer

    For those after some of the bigger Linux games, you should take a look at Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week.

  • The updated release of 'Desperados: Wanted Dead or Alive' that has Linux support is now on GOG

    As a reminder, the updated release from THQ Nordic doesn't just add Linux support. It also adds language support for French, German, Spanish, Italian, Russian and English to the main game. It also adds in the lost demo level, with more limited language support.

More in Tux Machines

Folding@Home Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is Folding@Home. Folding@Home was accidentally left out of yesterday's RTX 2080 Ti CUDA/OpenCL comparison with simply forgetting to add the FAHBench test profile to the run queue. But as there is often interest in seeing the FAHBench performance on new GPUs by at least a few of the premium enablers, I ran some extra tests just looking at the Folding@Home performance and here are those results today. Read more

today's howtos

Games: Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Humble Monthly and DXVK Updates

FOSS, standard essential patents and FRAND in the European Union

As part of the research project on “The Interaction between Open Source Software and FRAND licensing in Standardisation”, a workshop was organised by the European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) in collaboration with Directorate General Communications Networks, Content and Technology (CONNECT) to present and discuss the intermediate results to date. The workshop took place in Brussels on September 18, 2018. I presented a set of observations from the research on the case studies performed as part of the project that are outlined below. Other speakers where Catharina Maracke on the issue of legal compliance between Open Source and FRAND licenses, Bruce Perens on “Community Dynamics in Open Source”, and Andy Updegrove on “Dynamics in Standardisation”. You may ask what the relevance of this debate is for the wider Free and Open Source Software community. The obvious answer is that to distribute software “without restriction”, the user needs all the usage rights associated with the program. While most FOSS contributors assume that this is naturally the central motivation for anybody to contribute in the first place, there is a long history of attempts to maintain some sort of exclusive control over a piece of FOSS code, possibly using other rights than copyright. Read more