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Software and Games: Wego, Cockpit, Samba, Podman, Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week and GOG

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Software
Gaming
  • wego – ASCII weather app for the terminal

    I spend an inordinate amount of time at the command line. I almost live on the command line because of its convenience. It’s probably because I love terminal apps.

    wego is another gem of a terminal application. It’s open source weather software written in the Go programming language and designed for the terminal. It displays the weather in a variety of visually attractive ways. It’s a lightweight way to keep an eye on the weather without requiring a web browser. The information is SSL-encrypted for transmission to the local computer.

    You may have been using the software without knowing it. wttr.in is a web frontend for wego that you can access using curl to provide weather information from a terminal. If you’ve already got curl on your system, there’s nothing to install. It’s got lots of options; you can find out about them from curl wttr.in/:help

  • Cockpit 172

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 172.

  • Samba 4.9 Is Working On Many Improvements, New Features

    Developers behind Samba, the open-source SMB/CIFS implementation for providing integration with the Windows Server Domain and Windows clients, is preparing for their next 4.9 release.

    In stepping towards their first preview release of Samba 4.9, their news file has been getting filled in over the past couple days to reflect all of the changes that have been staged in Samba Git since the Samba 4.9 branching at the beginning of the year.

  • Using podman for containers

    Podman is one of the newer tool in the container world, it can help you to run OCI containers in pods. It uses Buildah to build containers, and runc or any other OCI compliant runtime. Podman is being actively developed.

    I have moved the two major bots we use for dgplug summer training (named batul and tenida) under podman and they are running well for the last few days.

  • The Humble Store 'Square Enix Publisher Week' has some great Linux games on offer

    For those after some of the bigger Linux games, you should take a look at Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week.

  • The updated release of 'Desperados: Wanted Dead or Alive' that has Linux support is now on GOG

    As a reminder, the updated release from THQ Nordic doesn't just add Linux support. It also adds language support for French, German, Spanish, Italian, Russian and English to the main game. It also adds in the lost demo level, with more limited language support.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation launches ELISA, an open source project for building safety-critical systems

Machines have a trust problem — particularly autonomous machines deployed in safety-critical scenarios, like industrial robots and driverless cars. In a pair of surveys published by the American Automobile Association last January and by Gallup in May, 63 percent of people reported feeling afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle and more than half said they’d never choose to ride in one. Moreover, in a report published by analysts at Pew in 2017, 70 percent of Americans said they were concerned about robots performing tasks currently handled by humans. In an effort to allay those fears, the Linux Foundation today launched Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA), an open source project comprising tools intended to help companies build and certify Linux-based systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. In partnership with British chip designer Arm, BMW, autonomous platforms company Kuka, Linutronix, and Toyota, ELISA will work with certification and standardization bodies in “multiple industries” to establish ways Linux can form the foundation of safety-critical systems across industries. ELISA’s launch follows last year’s rollout of Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) 5.0, the newest version of a Linux Foundation project aimed at bringing open source technology to the automotive industry. Previous releases focused mainly on infotainment systems, but 5.0 introduced telematics and mapping solutions that allow OEMs to share mapping data generated by autonomous cars, in addition to offering improved security and a functional safety platform. Toyota and Amazon expressed early support; the former is using AGL in its 2018 Camry. Read more Slashdot: Linux Foundation Launches ELISA, an Open Source Project For Building Safety-Critical Systems

Security Password Managers, Updates, Intel/Linux, 5 Antivirus for Android Devices and Cisco

  • Your Password Manager Has A Severe Flaw — But You Should Still Use One [Ed: Yet worse: 1) people putting password managers on platforms with back doors from Apple and Microsoft. 2) people putting all their password "in the cloud".]
    If you are an avid user of password managers, you might just be in for a surprise. A recent study by researchers at the Independent Security Evaluators found that a number of popular password managers were storing master passwords as plain text within the main memory of devices. To an expert hacker, this vulnerability is equivalent to getting the keys to multiple accounts as a text document on your computer. The master key of any password manager can be used to gain access to all usernames and passwords being managed by it.
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Fun Little Tidbits in a Howling Storm (Re: Intel Security Holes)
    Some kernel developers recently have been trying to work around the massive, horrifying, long-term security holes that have recently been discovered in Intel hardware. In the course of doing so, there were some interesting comments about coding practices. Christoph Hellwig and Jesper Dangaard Brouer were working on mitigating some of the giant speed sacrifices needed to avoid Intel's gaping security holes. And, Christoph said that one such patch would increase the networking throughput from 7.5 million packets per second to 9.5 million—a 25% speedup. To do this, the patch would check the kernel's "fast path" for any instances of dma_direct_ops and replace them with a simple direct call. Linus Torvalds liked the code, but he noticed that Jesper and Christoph's code sometimes would perform certain tests before testing the fast path. But if the kernel actually were taking the fast path, those tests would not be needed. Linus said, "you made the fast case unnecessarily slow."
  • 5 Antivirus for Android Devices That You Should Have in 2019
  • Duo Security Digs Into Chrome Extension Security With CRXcavator

A brief comparison of Java IDE’s: NetBeans Vs Eclipse

Thinking about entering the world of programming? What better way to enter than through Java and joining a community of over 10 million developers worldwide? Java is one of the most popular programming languages right now. It is an interpreted, object-oriented programming language which is directly supported by major operating systems like Apple, Linux, Windows, Sun etc. Java is a portable programming language meaning a program can be written on one platform and can run on all platforms. Java supports networking (you can use TCP and UDP sockets) and access remote data using a variety of protocols. It also provides the feature of multithreading, which can utilize multiple processors and one of the prime features of Java is garbage collection. In many languages, the programmer is responsible for deallocating memory and it can become a hassle resulting in errors and segmentation faults. Java, on the other hand, has a garbage collector which manages the memory and frees up the memory by destroying objects not in use. To start coding in Java you need to have Java installed, the latest version of Java is 11 but Java 8 is still supported so having any one of these installed will be enough to get you started. Writing a program and compiling it would take some effort as you will have to write the code in a text file and then save it in .java and then have to compile it using terminal, or you can use an IDE and save yourself the time and effort used in this process and get a slew of interesting features. An Integrated Development Environment or IDE for short, is a software application which helps the user to write and compile code easily by providing features like text editing, debugging plugins etc. while providing compilation by the click of one button. Java has many IDEs but two of the most popular ones are NetBeans and Eclipse. Read more

Graphics: AMDGPU, Mesa and Intel

  • AMDGPU Has Late Fixes For Linux 5.0: Golden Register Update For Vega 20, Display Fixes
    There are some last minute changes to the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for the upcoming Linux 5.0 kernel release. Being past RC7, it's quite late in the cycle but some work has materialized that AMD is seeking to get in ahead of the stable release for improving the Radeon open-source GPU support.
  • Mesa 19.1 Panfrost Driver Gets Pantrace & Pandecode Support To Help Reverse Engineering
    Since being added to Mesa 19.1 at the start of this month, the Panfrost driver has continued speeding along with bringing up this ARM Mali T600/T700/T860 open-source graphics driver support. The latest batch of code was merged overnight, including support for some reverse-engineering helpers.
  • Intel's Shiny Vulkan Overlay Layer Lands In Mesa 19.1 - Provides A HUD With Driver Stats
    As some more exciting open-source Intel Linux graphics news this week besides their new merge request to mainline the Iris Gallium3D driver, over in the Vulkan space they have merged today their overlay layer that provides a heads-up display of sorts for their Linux "ANV" driver. Last month we reported on Intel developing a Vulkan "heads-up display" for their driver to display various statistics to help the driver developers themselves as well as application/game developers. This is akin to Gallium HUD but suited for Vulkan usage rather than OpenGL.
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Merged To Mainline Mesa 19.1
    Well that sure didn't take long... Less than 24 hours after the merge request to mainline the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver was sent out, it's now been merged into the mainline code-base! The Intel Gallium3D driver is now in Mesa Git for easy testing of their next-generation OpenGL Linux driver. Making the day even more exciting for Intel Linux users is this driver's landing comes just minutes after the Vulkan overlay layer HUD was merged for Intel's ANV open-source driver.