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Security: BGP Hijack Factory, IDN, Microsoft Windows Back Doors and Intel Defects

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Security
  • Shutting down the BGP Hijack Factory

    It started with a lengthy email to the NANOG mailing list on 25 June 2018: independent security researcher Ronald Guilmette detailed the suspicious routing activities of a company called Bitcanal, whom he referred to as a “Hijack Factory.” In his post, Ronald detailed some of the Portuguese company’s most recent BGP hijacks and asked the question: why Bitcanal’s transit providers continue to carry its BGP hijacked routes on to the global [I]nternet?

    This email kicked off a discussion that led to a concerted effort to kick this bad actor, who has hijacked with impunity for many years, off the [I]nternet.

  • Malformed Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) Leads to Discovery of Vulnerability in IDN Libraries

    The Punycode decoder is an implementation of the algorithm described in section 6.2 of RFC 3492. As it walks the input string, the Punycode decoder fills the output array with decoded code point values. The output array itself is typed to hold unsigned 32-bit integers while the Unicode code point space fits within 21 bits. This leaves a remainder of 11 unused bits that can result in the production of invalid Unicode code points if accidentally set. The vulnerability is enabled by the lack of a sanity check to ensure decoded code points are less than the Unicode code point maximum of 0x10FFFF. As such, for offending input, unchecked decoded values are copied directly to the output array and returned to the caller.

  • GandCrab ransomware adds NSA tools for faster spreading

    "It no longer needs a C2 server (it can operate in airgapped environments, for example) and it now spreads via an SMB exploit -- including on XP and Windows Server 2003 (along with modern operating systems)," Beaumont wrote in a blog post. "As far as I'm aware, this is the first ransomware true worm which spreads to XP and 2003 -- you may remember much press coverage and speculation about WannaCry and XP, but the reality was the NSA SMB exploit (EternalBlue.exe) never worked against XP targets out of the box."

  • Intel Discloses New Spectre Flaws, Pays Researchers $100K

    Intel disclosed a series of vulnerabilities on July 10, including new variants of the Spectre vulnerability the company has been dealing with since January.

    Two new Spectre variants were discovered by security researchers Vladimir Kiriansky and Carl Waldspurger, who detailed their findings in a publicly released research paper tilted, "Speculative Buffer Overflows: Attacks and Defenses."

    "We introduce Spectre1.1, a new Spectre-v1 variant that leverages speculative stores to create speculative buffer over-flows," the researchers wrote. "We also present Spectre 1.2 on CPUs that do not enforce read/write protections, speculative stores can overwrite read-only data and code pointers to breach sandboxes."

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Security Leftovers

  • Major 9.8 vulnerability affects multiple Linux kernels— CVE-2019-8912 (af_alg_release())
    Our assessment is that the cause is this commit, the introduction of a "sockfs_setattr()" function. This function neglects to null-out values in a structure, making their values usable after exiting from the function (a so-called ‘use-after-free’ error).
  • Linux use-after-free vulnerability found in Linux 2.6 through 4.20.11
    Last week, a Huawei engineer reported a vulnerability present in the early Linux 2.6 kernels through version 4.20.11. The Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN) that detects dynamic memory errors within the Linux kernel code was used to uncover the use-after-free vulnerability which was present since early Linux versions. The use-after-free issue was found in the networking subsystem’s sockfs code and could lead to arbitrary code execution as a result.
  • Taking Care of Your Personal Online Security (For Paranoids)
    So, use Linux, and preferably coreboot or Libreboot (open source BIOS). You can buy hardware based on the recommendations of well-known and respected (still a bit paranoid) cypherpunk Richard Stallman.
  • Why do PAM projects fail? Tales from the trenches
    Privileged accounts hold the keys to highly sensitive company information and once these credentials are targeted, they can easily lead to a breach of a company’s most valuable assets; from databases to social media and unstructured data. Most enterprises have implemented some form of Privileged Access Management (PAM), but many find these initiatives fail to live up to expectations. Below are some common reasons why a PAM project might fail to meet the initial expectations; coupled with practical insights on how to prevent it from becoming a dud.
  • Sailfish OS: Security and Data Privacy
    Mobile World Congress is back again! Like every single year during the Jolla journey, we are excited to take part in this event. We have had great experiences in the past MWC’s, our main drivers for attending are the current and relevant topics discussed during the congress. One of this year’s core themes is Digital Trust; “Digital trust analyses the growing responsibilities required to create the right balance with consumers, governments and regulators.” It makes us happy that these topics are being discussed, especially since several scandals have recently affected trust in digital solutions. At Jolla we work constantly towards providing a secure and transparent solution. Our value towards our customer’s privacy is reflected in our values and actions. Back in May of 2018 our CEO Sami Pienimäki wrote a blog post on the GDPR laws passed within the European Union and stated the cornerstones on how Jolla views data privacy. This stand on privacy is not rocket science – the core idea is to respect our customers’ privacy and allow them to be in control of their data.
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Which is More Secure: Windows, Linux, or macOS? [Ed: security is not an OS feature but a separate product, insists company that sells "security" as a proprietar ysoftware product]

Games: BATTLETECH, Tesla vs Lovecraft and More

Linux Foundation, Linux 5.0 and Linux 5.1

  • Certified danger
    I suspected Linux Foundation went to the dark side when they started strange deals with Microsoft. But I'm pretty sure they went to dark side now.
  • The Most Interesting Highlights To The Linux 5.0 Kernel
    With the Linux 5.0 kernel due out within the next week or two, here's a look back at the biggest end-user facing changes for this kernel release that started out as Linux 4.21.
  • AMDGPU Squeezes In Revised Context Priority Handling For Linux 5.1
    With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle soon to kick-off, an early batch of fixes for the AMDGPU DRM driver and other fixes were sent in on Thursday to queue along with all of the new functionality being staged in DRM-Next. There's a lot of DRM improvements and throughout all the kernel subsystems of new material queuing up for Linux 5.1. On the AMDGPU side there is AMDGPU DC seamless boot bits, PCI Express bandwidth utilization is now exported to user-space, Vega power management updates, DCC support for scanout surfaces, better page-flipping in DC, and various Vega 20 fixes.

Videos: Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon, Bash Commands and FLOSS Weekly With ClearlyDefined

  • Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon Run Through
    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon.
  • JC’s Favorite BASH Commands
    We chill and look at some cool commands for the BASH terminal and scripts.
  • FLOSS Weekly 518: Clearly Defined
    Carol Smith is the program manager for ClearlyDefined, a project under the Open Source Initiative. ClearlyDefined is an open source project to crowd-source the gathering, curation, and upstreaming of licensing and security (and more) data about free and open source projects.