Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ATI's MultiVPU solution, don't get caught in the crossfire?

Filed under
Hardware

We'll have to give it to ATI for keeping our gaze fixed upon their new product for so long, whilst being fed all sorts of incomplete information about prospective performance and features. Now that the curtain has dropped on ATI's multi graphics processor solution we can only wonder what they have been doing for the past six months. Initially ATI commented that their solution would be a flexible and elegant one, and would, for example, work on any motherboard that has two PCIe slots, regardless of configuration. We would also be able to combine any two ATI PCIe graphics cards and get a boost in performance.

ATI was also quick to comment on NVIDIA's solution being a cumbersome one, requiring a special SLI motherboard, two identical graphics cards and last but not least an internal SLI connector to establish communication between the two cards. From looking at the ATI Crossfire solution they managed to eliminate none of these "drawbacks" as their solution has about the same requirements as NVIDIA's. You will also need a new motherboard sporting an ATI chipset with Crossfire support, a "master" graphics card that will work with any 2nd ATI PCIe graphics card and last, but not least, an external dongle to enable the two cards talk to each other.

So we are left scratching our heads, exactly how is this solution more elegant and flexible than NVIDIA's? At least NVIDIA's solution works with any 6800 or 6600 series graphics card, the Crossfire solution requires the purchase of a +$500 master card, so much for flexibility. And what's with that external dongle? An internal connector to establish communication and freeing the bracket of cable clutter and enabling a 2nd DVI or S-Video output is a far more elegant solution. By the looks of it the affordable SLI alternative that Crossfire was pitched as a few months ago has now turned into an expensive and not at all flexible solution that does not offer anything substantial over NVIDIA's. For the time being we'd suggest you stick with NVIDIA's solution and don't get caught in the crossfire.

Sander Sassen.

More in Tux Machines

LLVM Clang 3.5 Brings Some Compiler Performance Improvements

If all goes well, LLVM 3.5 will be released today. While we have already delivered some LLVM/Clang benchmarks of the 3.5 SVN code, over the days ahead we will be delivering more benchmarks of the updated compiler stack -- including looking at its performance against the in-development GCC 5.0. For getting this latest series of compiler benchmarking at Phoronix started, here's some fresh numbers of LLVM Clang 3.4 compared to a recent release candidate of LLVM Clang 3.5. This article is using a CompuLab Intense-PC with Intel Core i7 3517UE Ivy Bridge processor for LLVM Clang 3.4 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 benchmarking. The host system was Ubuntu 14.04 x86_64 and was running off the Linux 3.17 development kernel. Both compilers were built in their optimized release mode (--disable-assertions --enable-optimized) for the core-avx-i CPU. Aside from switching out LLVM Clang 3.4 for LLVM Clang 3.5 RC4, no other system changes were made. Read more

Celebrate Software Freedom Day on September 20

I am very glad to share with you that registration of the eleventh edition of Software Freedom Day has been opened since early August and you can see from our SFD event map, we already have 129 events from more than 50 countries shown in our map. As usual registration happens after you have created your event page on the wiki. We have a detail guide here for newcomers and for the others who need help, the SFD-Discuss mailing would be the best place to get prompt support. Don’t forget to tell people about SFD! Simply use one of the banners we’ve made if you are organizing, participating, attending or speaking at a SFD event by placing it on your webpages and link it back to your SFD event page or http://www.softwarefreedomday.org. You can also help us to promote SFD by placing our SFD counter with your own language as well! Read more

[GNU IceCat] browser is (finally) on Fedora

GNU Icecat will be available on Fedora updates-testing repositories for some days. That’s right time to test harshly this new web browser (really it’s not so new considering it’s a fork of Firefox) and leave a positive/negative karma or open a bug. Read more

today's howtos