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Linux hot, standards not with China, Taiwan

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Linux
Interviews

Earlier this year, members of Chinese and Taiwanese IT associations announced broad plans to work together to jointly develop and promote Linux as well as home-grown standards for certain IT components. The idea is to match Taiwan's technology prowess with China's huge number of users as a base for a global Linux putsch, and to create new standards to compete with global initiatives from Blu-ray to CDMA (Code Division Mutliple Access). At an IT trade show in Shanghai, IDG News Service (IDGNS) caught up with Roger Liao, deputy director of international affairs at one of Taiwan's biggest industry groups, the Taiwan Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association (TEEMA), to discuss progress on both fronts, in addition to other IT developments in China.

IDG News Service: How is work on Linux progressing? What's popular and what's not in Taiwan and China?

Liao: It really depends on what kind of product you're talking about. For example, China really wants to promote Linux as an OS, because it's more stable. But Microsoft is by far the more popular OS here because people are used to it and it has a larger market share. Microsoft's recent deal with Novell is another aspect that's very interesting, but it's too early to say how that will affect Linux development and usage in China.

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