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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebook Users Will Soon Be Able to Install Debian Packages via the Files App

    Google continues to work on the Linux app support implementation for its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks by adding initial support for installing Debian packages via the Files app.

    Linux app support in Chrome OS is here, but it's currently in beta testing as Google wants to make it ready for the masses in an upcoming stable Chrome OS release. Meanwhile, Google's Chrome OS team details in a recent Chromium Gerrit commit initial support for installing Linux packages in the .deb file format used by Debian-based operating systems directly from the Files app.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.2 Milestone 1 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking

    The first development snapshot of Phoronix Test Suite 8.2 is now available as what will be the next quarterly feature update to our open-source Linux / BSD / macOS / Windows automated benchmarking software and framework.

  • How To Install Plex Media Server on CentOS 7
  • How to Recover Files from Corrupted or Damaged ReiserFS File Systems? DiskInternals Has the Answer
  • DXVK 0.63 Released With Support For NVIDIA's Latest Driver

    For those planning to enjoy their favorite Direct3D 11 games under Wine this weekend and utilizing the DXVK D3D11-over-Vulkan layer for greater performance, DXVK 0.63 is now available.

    First up with DXVK 0.63 is compatibility with the newly-released NVIDIA 396.45 stable driver release due to Vulkan driver changes.

  • Northgard introduces the Clan of the Snake in a new DLC

    Thriving in the harsh northern lands in Northgard isn’t particularly easy and the new Snake Clan faction adds a few twists to the enjoyable Viking experience. An update that released alongside the DLC also adds several bells and whistles to all players for free.

  • Meg Ford: GUADEC 2018

    I was particularly interested in and disappointed by Michael Catanzaro's talk "Migrating from JHBuild to BuildStream". I appreciate all the time and effort the Release Team has put into maintaining and developing the build systems, so I'm including my experience here as an example, not as a criticism.
    Over time I've gotten used to JHBuild and become adept at searching for and fixing its sometimes bizarre error messages. A few months ago, after running into some modules that failed on JHBuild, I read the announcement about GNOME's modulesets moving to BuildStream. I spent a couple days removing JHBuild and rebuilding everything in BuildStream. Except I ran out of disk space. So I removed as much as I could and started over. Except then PulseAudio wouldn't work. Luckily I'd occasionally run into the same errors caused by an unavailable PulseAudio daemon when I was using JHBuild. I tried restarting the daemon, etc, and looked for info on the subject. In the end it turned out that PulseAudio wasn't available within the sandbox, so I scrapped BuildStream and went back to JHBuild.
    Going forward, I'm planning to move from JHBuild to using FlatPak, Builder, and GNOME's nightly runtime build. I'm happy that the community is providing solutions, and, while things are still in a confusing state, at least they are moving quickly in interesting and promising directions.

  • On Flatpak Nightlies

    As far as I know, it was not possible to run any nightly applications during this two week period, except developer applications like Builder that depend on org.gnome.Sdk instead of the normal org.gnome.Platform. If you used Epiphany Technology Preview and wanted a functioning web browser, you had to run arcane commands to revert to the last good runtime version.

    This multi-week response time is fairly typical for us. We need to improve our workflow somehow. It would be nice to be able to immediately revert to the last good build once a problem has been identified, for instance.

    Meanwhile, even when the runtime is working fine, some apps have been broken for months without anyone noticing or caring. Perhaps it’s time for a rethink on how we handle nightly apps. It seems likely that only a few apps, like Builder and Epiphany, are actually being regularly used. The release team has some hazy future plans to take over responsibility for the nightly apps (but we have to take over the runtimes first, since those are more important), and we’ll need to somehow avoid these issues when we do so. Having some form of notifications for failed builds would be a good first step.

  • TLS 1.3 Via GnuTLS Is Planned For Fedora 29

    The feature list for Fedora 29 continues growing and the latest is about shipping GnuTLS with TLS 1.3 support enabled.

    TLS 1.3 was approved by the Internet Engineering Task Force earlier this year as the newest version of this protocol for making secure web connections that is key to HTTPS. TLS 1.3 offers various security and performance improvements over TLS 1.2 as well as lower-latency, better handling of long-running sessions, etc.

  • Xubuntu 17.10 EOL

    On Thursday 19th July 2018, Xubuntu 17.10 goes End of Life (EOL). For more information please see the Ubuntu 17.10 EOL Notice.

  • Linux Mint developers planning big Cinnamon 4.0 improvements

    Linux Mint is one of the most popular Linux-based desktop operating systems for a reason -- it’s really good. By leveraging the excellent Ubuntu for its base, and offering a top-notch user experience, success is pretty much a guarantee.

    While the distribution primarily focuses on two desktop environments -- Mate and Cinnamon -- the latter is really the star of the show. Cinnamon is great because it uses a classic WIMP interface that users love, while also feeling modern. With Cinnamon 3.8, the Linux Mint Team focused on improving the DE's performance, and today, the team shares that it is continuing that mission with the upcoming 4.0. In particular, the team is focusing on Vsync.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • NS1 Creates Open Source Tool for Testing DNS Performance and Functionality
    NS1, the leader in next-generation DNS and traffic management solutions, today announced the availability of Flamethrower...
  • Databricks open sources Delta Lake for data lake reliability
    Databricks, a specialist in Unified Analytics and founded by the original creators of Apache Spark, has announced a new open source project called Delta Lake to deliver reliability to data lakes. Delta Lake is the first production-ready open source technology to provide data lake reliability for both batch and streaming data. This new open source project will enable organisations to transform their existing messy data lakes into clean Delta Lakes with high quality data, thereby accelerating their data and Machine Learning initiatives.
  • KubeCon China Mini-Film
  • First Timer’s guide to Red Hat Summit
    For many people, Red Hat Summit is an annual ritual. A chance once again to catch up on Red Hat’s plans for the year, learn about new technologies, see colleagues and friends, and make new acquaintances. They’ve got the routine down, and are ready to get the most out of Summit from start to finish. New to Red Hat Summit? We want to help you do the same - so read on for some tips to help you get the most out of your first time joining us at Summit. Also puppies.
  • Now Ponder Mistakes: NPM's heavy-handed management prompts JS code registry challenger
    The recent management change and layoffs at JavaScript accessory outfit NPM Inc prompted several former employees to speculate that the company's alleged union-busting push toward profitability may well spur the creation of competition. The Register was also told to pay attention to JSConf EU in June as a possible launchpad for an NPM Inc rival. There's no need to wait that long. On Wednesday this week, Victor Bjelkholm, a Swedish developer based in Barcelona, introduced the Open-Registry, an "NPM registry replacement with a proper community governance." It's the first of what we're told are several ventures born of blowback from NPM Inc's attempted transition from investment crematorium to cash cow.
  • Automate Software Security Checks to Find Open Source Software, SDK Perils
  • Dead Windows Media Center returns? Ex-Microsoft employee posts SDK on GitHub [Ed: SDK for proprietary software is still a trap. Stay well away from Microsoft.]
  • Volkswagen partners with Minespider an open-source blockchain protocol
  • MongoDB to acquire open-source mobile database Realm for $39 million

    The deal is expected to close in June or July, and the companies are working on integrations and will be announcing details at the MongoDB World customer conference in mid-June.

  • Elsevier and Norway Agree on New Open-Access Deal

    After unsuccessful negotiations between a coalition of Norwegian organizations and the academic publisher Elsevier culminated in cancelled subscriptions earlier this year, the two have successfully established a new nationwide licensing agreement. The deal, which was announced yesterday (April 23), is a pilot program that covers a period of two years, during which articles with corresponding authors from Norway will be published open access in most of Elsevier’s journals.

ODROID-N2 Offer Six Cortex-A73/A53 Cores For $65~82, Good Performance In Linux Benchmarks

Hardkernel's newest single board computer is the ODROID-N2 that they sent over a few weeks ago for benchmarking. The ODROID-N2 is built around the Amlogic S922X SoC and features four Cortex-A73 cores and two Cortex-A53 cores, options for 2GB or 4GB of DDR4 system memory, eMMC connectivity, Gigabit Ethernet, and four USB 3.0 ports for starting out just above $60 USD. The ODROID-N2's use of an Amlogic S922X big.LITTLE design makes for an interesting setup with the four Cortex-A73 cores clocking up to 1.8GHz and the two Cortex-A53 cores able to hit 1.9GHz. This SoC uses the Mali G52 Bifrost GPU, which eventually should see nice driver support via the open-source Panfrost graphics driver stack. Read more

Server: FreedomBox, Cumulus Network and SUSE

  • How to run FreedomBox as a VirtualBox VM
    You might have heard of FreedomBox. If not, it's a $100 box you can buy, which allows you to take back control of your internet-based services (See: Put the internet back under your control with the FreedomBox).
  • Cumulus NetQ aimed at broader enterprise market
    Cumulus Networks has overhauled its data center tool set for network troubleshooting and change validation, adding a mainstream, enterprise-friendly graphical dashboard. The pure-play networking company launched the graphical user interface (GUI) this week as a component of Cumulus NetQ 2.0. The latest version of the network operations tool set also includes a new database for storing and managing more network telemetry data than the previous version. With the latest release, Cumulus has revamped NetQ to address the needs of a broader segment of the market for enterprise data center networking, said Brad Casemore, an analyst at IDC. Cumulus has three primary offerings: a Linux-based network operating system; branded hardware switches, called Cumulus Express; and NetQ.
  • Wrangling Your Data Tornado with SAP Data Hub and SUSE CaaS Platform (Webinar – May 1st)
  • Beastly documentation: A SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 reorg story
    Cloud 9 is a complex beast, and so is its documentation. And like any other beast, the documentation needs occasional grooming.

Kernel: APIs, KernelShark 1.0, VMware, NVIDIA and AMD

  • Linux and MS-Windows APIs for Custom Development of VQuad™ Applications
    Speaking to the press Mr. Robert Bichefsky, Director of Engineering at GL Communications Inc said, “Open source is ubiquitous, it’s almost unavoidable and Linux is the leader in open source. So, GL supports Linux Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for our flagship products!
  • KernelShark 1.0 Soon Being Released For Visualizing "Trace-cmd" Linux Kernel Tracing
    After being in development pretty much this entire decade, KernelShark 1.0 will soon be released as the visualizer around the trace-cmd that wraps Ftrace for internal Linux kernel tracing. KernelShark produces various visuals and makes it easier to analyze the trace data generated from the tracing tools to make it easier to understand the behavior going on within the kernel. It's good to see this GUI utility still advancing as it's been quite a while since last hearing anything about KernelShark.
  • VMware Working On Emulated Coherent Graphics Memory - Needed For GL 4.4 / Vulkan
    For ironing out the OpenGL 4.4+ support within their VMWGFX virtual graphics driver stack and/or for starting out work on bringing up Vulkan support to guest VMs running VMware virtualization products, their longtime graphics driver team is working on emulated coherent graphics memory support. Longtime Mesa contributor Thomas Hellstrom, who had been with Tungsten Graphics before being acquired by VMware, posted their latest code on Wednesday for emulating coherent graphics memory support as needed by the latest OpenGL revisions and Vulkan.
  • How to Build a Network Video Recorder With an Nvidia Jetson Nano
    In the middle of working on an update to our articles on home video surveillance systems, I bought one of Nvidia’s new Jetson Nanos. While playing with the $99 board and using it to do object recognition using a variety of cameras, it suddenly occurred to me that it would be a pretty interesting starting point for a slick little Network Video Recorder (NVR) NAS device. It consumes very little power and is portable. Plus, the integrated GPU has more AI capacity than most larger NAS units, and the Nano comes with tons of AI tools pre-installed. So for those wanting to play with their own motion or person or package or pet recognition, it’d be ideal. [...] Nvidia makes it really easy to set up the Nano. All you need is a microSD card and a computer to flash the L4T (Linux For Tegra) image. Technically, all you need is 16GB, but the system takes most of that, so I used a high-speed 64GB card. Once you’ve attached a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, all you need to do is plug in a micro USB power supply and you’ll be running Ubuntu 18.04. A wide variety of AI tools and demo applications are pre-installed for you.
  • New AMD Navi Linux code confirms the GCN design of the new GPUs
    AMD has already started dropping Navi driver code out into the wider Linux ecosystem, with a few key code drops in place right now and full driver enablement for the new graphics architecture likely to drop soon. These first little bits of Linux code don’t really tell us a whole lot about the new graphics cards, but do at least seem to nix all the recent rumours about Navi being built on a different design to the current Graphics Core Next setup. So yeah, Navi looks set to be GCN. There had been earlier rumours that Navi would be the first post-GCN GPU design, and that would allow it to break past the 4,096 core limit supposedly imposed by the current macro-architecture, but it seems Navi is following the same overall path as previous GCN designs.