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Slax 9.5.0 released

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I am happy to announce that a next version of Slax Linux has been released. Slax is a minimalistic, fully modular operating system. As usual, this version incorporates all upstream improvements from Debian stable, and fixes few small known bugs.

I am also happy to announce that it is now possible to purchase Slax preinstalled on an USB flash drive with hardware-based AES encryption. This device is universally usable because the encryption is performed directly by the drive itself, there is no software to install needed. Once disconnected, the USB drive automatically locks itself again. Payment is possible only with Bitcoin, because I truly wish to see PayPal and credit card companies to cease to exist soon.

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In Phoronix now

Now Softpedia

  • Debian-Based Slax 9.5.0 Released, Now Available on Hardware-Encrypted USB Keys

    Slax developer Tomas Matejicek announced today the release and immediate availability of the Slax 9.5.0 release with the latest updates and security patches.

    Since it's been rebased on the Debian GNU/Linux operating system, Slax saw two releases, versions 9.3.0 and 9.4.0, which introduced numerous enhancements and new features, including one-click-to-install launchers, support for various Wi-Fi devices, EXT4 and NTFS support, and persistent support enabled by default when booting from USB flash drives.

Slax 9.5 released: light-weight, modular Linux distro

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