Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Why C has no place in Computer Science research

Filed under
Software

I came across this post, which highlights top 5 reasons why a developer should unlearn C. Given the past experience I had with realities of C development I mostly concur with the author.

In the last months I was deeply involved with building a resource broker component for the Grid Operating System project I am involved with. The biggest mistake I made initially was to go along with a C webservices framework, Apache Axis2/C thinking that in an OS level project most of the stuff should be in C due to speed and optimization reasons. This was a decision which cost us months! The original broker itself was developed pretty quickly, perhaps in 2 weeks, and we deveployed it in machines took results everything went fine. Now, when I upgraded the systems to Slackware 11.0, and then ran the broker, nothing will work! It will always segfault as soon as the service was started, I tried 20+ hrs session of debugging fixing the problem but to no avail. I traced the problem to the the framework in which it was built, Axis2/C and contacted a developer to seek some help, but the reply was that the framework was not stable for some platforms now and it will take some months for a stable version to be released. The latest release is Axis2/C 0.95.

Full Post.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Darling ('Wine' for OS X) and Games Leftovers

Linux 4.13.14, 4.9.63, 4.4.99, and 3.18.82