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Dump Linux now!

Filed under
Linux

I have always been a fan of fringe operating systems.

This was September, 1993. My timing couldn't've been better. I found a reference to Linux, a freely-available Unix-like operating system. Archie did the rest.

I spent about two days downloading the twenty or thirty floppy images of the SLS distribution. I used the "rawrite" utility to dump the images to floppy. After just a couple of days, and copious perusal of the comp.os.linux usenet newsgroup, I had X11 running on my 386 with 4M RAM, and 40M hard drive. My favorite thing for the next two days was to watch multiple copies of xgas running simultaneously. It beat working, anyway.

That was my beginning with GNU/Linux, and for the last 13 years, I have used GNU/Linux almost exclusively. I am amused at people who ask, "Is Linux ready for the desktop?" Um, yeah. Only for the last decade.

But now I think it is time to dump GNU/Linux.

Don't get me wrong: I still love GNU/Linux. It's just gotten. . . boring. It's no longer the undiscovered country, the wild west, the final frontier. Linux is so ready for the desktop, it's boring.

Full Story.

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