Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Computer show opens in Taiwan

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The world's second-largest annual computer show, Computex, opened Tuesday in Taiwan, with organizers expecting the highest number of buyers and visitors in the exhibition's 25-year history.

The show trails only CeBIT, held in the German city of Hannover, in the number of exhibitors - having overtaken the U.S. show Comdex in recent years - according to the Taiwan External Trade Development Council and the Taipei Computer Association, the exhibition's two organizers.

Technology watchers say the event is an indicator of industry trends, and of computer sector demand in the second half of the year.

Nearly 30,000 international buyers and more than 120,000 visitors from Taiwan and abroad are expected, the organizers said. There were at some 26,000 buyers and 118,052 visitors last year.

The organizers said there will be 1,288 exhibitors this year total, down slightly from 1,347 last year, while the number of booths will be a little higher at 2,853, compared with 2,828 in 2004.

The show, which runs from Tuesday to Saturday, features companies from 22 countries. Exhibitors include Intel Corp., Microsoft Corp., Toshiba Corp. and Infineon Technologies AG.

Some of Taiwan's top companies such as computer firm Acer Inc., contract electronics manufacturer Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. and Asustek Computer Inc. - the world's leading motherboard maker - will also be present.

Associated Press

More in Tux Machines

Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

Why choose open source? “In some ways, [the open source software used by the agency] is effectively more capable” than commercial products, he said. “In terms of cost-effectiveness, [it] wins hands down: no license/maintenance fees, extensible architecture [and] global open source R&D.” The team uses an open source software package called ‘R’. Read more

Emacs & the obsessive email mongerer

I had already mentioned in passing here that I am using Emacs for a variety of tasks: outline, project management and planning with Org-Mode, IRC (go figure, my default email client on all my machines is Emacs’ ERC), notes editing or quick scribbling with the Scartch buffer (happens to me all day long), and regularly, albeit less frequently than in 2013, various editing of html pages, javascript and sometimes even Python when I dare to edit one or two things in Python scripts. A consequence of all these use cases is that I have Emacs open almost everyday on almost any of my machines. Read more

MIPS tempts hackers with Raspbery Pi-like dev board

Hard to choose between Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, and MinnowBoard Max? Now there’s another choice: the open source MIPS-based “Creator CI20″ dev board. In a bid to harness some of the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the ISA’s counter to ARM’s popular Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black SBCs. These days, every processor vendor simply must have a community supported dev board in order to engage with the developer communities. (Incidentally, Intel’s is the MinnowBoard Max and AMD’s is the Gizmo.) Read more

Samsung announces the Gear S while LG officially unveils the G Watch R

Samsung announced yet another smartwatch, Samsung Gear S that runs Tizen and comes with a 3G wireless radio. I have seen some call this the Gear Note because it does have a long two inch curved Super AMOLED display. The Gear S has WiFi, Bluetooth, and 3G radios and antennas inside so you can use the watch when your phone isn't handy. Turn-by-turn pedestrian navigation is powered by HERE. It has an integrated GPS chip and can be used for exercise, again without a phone connection. Read more