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Android
  • Google Pixel 3 Complete Leak Reveals A Massive Notch And Full Specs
  • Android Pie: 5 features to check out first

    Google has just launched Android Pie, aka Android 9.0. As usual, the latest and greatest version of Android will only be on a short list of devices at first—Pixels, and a handful of Android One and Project Treble phones—but the release signals big things for Android. Here are the five new Android features you should check out first once your phone gets a piece of the pie.

  • Jeff Bailey Takes Over As Head Of Android Open Source Project
  • Google appoints Jeff Bailey as new head of AOSP

    Android P was officially given a version number and tasty nickname this week. To go along with the big announcement of Android 9 Pie, Google pushed the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). That wasn’t the only new thing in AOSP this week. Google also named Jeff Bailey as the new lead for AOSP.

  • Android 9.0 Pie Officially Released, Rolling Out Now to Google Pixel Devices

    Google released today the final release of the Android 9.0 Linux-based mobile operating system for all supported Google Pixel devices, finally revealing the codename of the Android P release as Pie.

    Tailored for long-time and new Android users alike, the Android 9 Pie operating system release adapts to your needs every single day, learning your preferences and providing you with the best Android mobile experience possible. It comes with numerous new features and improvements that you can discover in the next paragraphs.

    "Android 9 adapts to you and how you use your phone, learning your preferences as you go. Your experience gets better and better over time, and it keeps things running smoother, longer," says Google. Android 9 harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to give you more. It’s smarter, faster and adjusts as you go for a better fit."

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Get started with Roland, a random selection tool for the command line

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way. Here's the seventh of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019. Read more

Nginx vs Apache: Which Serves You Best in 2019?

For two decades Apache held sway over the web server market which is shrinking by the day. Not only has Nginx caught up with the oldest kid on the block, but it is currently the toast of many high traffic websites. Apache users might disagree here. That is why one should not jump to conclusions about which web server is better. The truth is that both form the core of complete web stacks (LAMP and LEMP), and the final choice boils down to individual needs. For instance, people running Drupal websites often call on Apache, whereas WordPress users seem to favor Nginx as much if not more. Accordingly, our goal is to help you understand your own requirements better rather than providing a one-size recommendation. Having said that, the following comparison between the two gives an accurate picture. Read more

Security: Updates, 'Smart' Things, Android Proprietary Software and Firefox Woes on Windows

  • Security updates for Friday
  • How Do You Handle Security in Your Smart Devices?
    Look around your daily life and that of your friends and family, and you’ll see that smart devices are beginning to take over our lives. But this also means an increase in a need for security, though not everyone realizes it, as discussed in a recent article on our IoT-related site. Are you aware of the need for security even when it’s IoT-related? How do you handle security in your smart devices?
  • A Vulnerability in ES File Explorer Exposes All of Your Files to Anyone on the Same Network
  • 2018 Roundup: Q1
    One of our major pain points over the years of dealing with injected DLLs has been that the vendor of the DLL is not always apparent to us. In general, our crash reports and telemetry pings only include the leaf name of the various DLLs on a user’s system. This is intentional on our part: we want to preserve user privacy. On the other hand, this severely limits our ability to determine which party is responsible for a particular DLL. One avenue for obtaining this information is to look at any digital signature that is embedded in the DLL. By examining the certificate that was used to sign the binary, we can extract the organization of the cert’s owner and include that with our crash reports and telemetry. In bug 1430857 I wrote a bunch of code that enables us to extract that information from signed binaries using the Windows Authenticode APIs. Originally, in that bug, all of that signature extraction work happened from within the browser itself, while it was running: It would gather the cert information on a background thread while the browser was running, and include those annotations in a subsequent crash dump, should such a thing occur.