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Julia 1.0

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The much anticipated 1.0 release of Julia is the culmination of nearly a decade of work to build a language for greedy programmers. JuliaCon2018 celebrated the event with a reception where the community officially set the version to 1.0.0 together.

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Try Julia by downloading version 1.0 now. If you’re upgrading code from Julia 0.6 or earlier, we encourage you to first use the transitional 0.7 release, which includes deprecation warnings to help guide you through the upgrade process. Once your code is warning-free, you can change to 1.0 without any functional changes. The registered packages are in the midst of taking advantage of this stepping stone and releasing 1.0-compatible updates.

The single most significant new feature in Julia 1.0, of course, is a commitment to language API stability: code you write for Julia 1.0 will continue to work in Julia 1.1, 1.2, etc. The language is “fully baked.” The core language devs and community alike can focus on packages, tools, and new features built upon this solid foundation.

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Also: Julia 1.0 Released, 2018 State of Rust Survey, Samsung Galaxy Note 9 Launches Today, Margaret Dawson of Red Hat Named Business Role Model of the Year in Women in IT Awards and Creative Commons Awarded $800,000 from Arcadia

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Stable Clonezilla live 2.6.7-28 Released

This release of Clonezilla live (2.6.7-28) includes major enhancements and bug fixes.
ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES from 2.6.6-15

  • The underlying GNU/Linux operating system was upgraded. This release is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2020/Jun/30).
  • Linux kernel was updated to 5.7.6-1.
  • ocs-iso, ocs-live-dev: sync syslinux-related files when copying syslinux exec files.
  • When creating recovery iso/zip file, if it's in Clonezilla live environment, we have those syslinux files. Use that first so the version mismatch can be avoided. Ref: https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/support-requests/127/
  • Move grub-header.cfg from bootx64.efi to grub.cfg so that it's more flexible.
  • To avoid conflict with the patch of grub in CentOS/Fedora, for GRUB EFI NB MAC/IP config style, the netboot file is now like grub.cfg-drbl-00:50:56:01:01:01 and grub.cfg-drbl-192.168.177.2 not grub.cfg-01-* anymore.
  • Add xen-tools
  • Partclone was updated to 0.3.14. The codes about xfs was updated to be 4.20.0.
  • Package exfat-fuse was removed since the kernel has module for that.
  • A better mechanism to deal with linuxefi/initrdefi or linux/initrd in the grub config was added.
  • Read more

Pico-ITX board based on i.MX8M ships with Linux BSP

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Programming: Rust, Perl, Compilers, IBM/Red Hat and More

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