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Linux Foundation: Academy, Wall Street and Surveillance Giants

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Linux
  • The Academy teams up with the Linux Foundation for open source tech
  • Academy Software Foundation will let filmmakers use open source creative software

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation today launched the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF) to provide a neutral forum for open source software developers in the motion picture and broader media industries to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation, and sound.

  • Hollywood Goes Open Source: Academy Teams Up With Linux Foundation to Launch Academy Software Foundation

    Hollywood now has its very own open source organization: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation, which is dedicated to advance the use of open source in film making and beyond.

    The association’s founding members include Animal Logic, Autodesk, Blue Sky Studios, Cisco, DNEG, DreamWorks, Epic Games, Foundry, Google Cloud, Intel, SideFX, Walt Disney Studios and Weta Digital. Together, they want to promote open source, help studios and others in Hollywood with open source licensing issues and manage open source projects under the helm of the Software Foundation.

    The cooperation between the Academy and the Linux Foundation began a little over two years ago, when the Academy’s Science and Technology Council began to look into Hollywood’s use of open source software. “It’s the culmination of a couple of years of work,” said Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) head Rob Bredow in an interview with Variety this week.

  • Hollywood gets its own open-source foundation

    Open source is everywhere now, so maybe it’s no surprise that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (yes, the organization behind the Oscars) today announced that it has partnered with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation, a new open-source foundation for developers in the motion picture and media space.

    The founding members include a number of high-powered media and tech companies, including Animal Logic, Blue Sky Studios, Cisco, DreamWorks, Epic Games, Google, Intel, SideFX, Walt Disney Studios and Weta Digital.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for All New Open FinTech Forum to Explore the Intersection of Financial Services and Open Source
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for All New Open FinTech Forum to Explore the Intersection of Financial Services and Open Source

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open FinTech Forum, taking place October 10-11 in New York.

  • LF Deep Learning signs up 5 more members, names AT&T's Gilbert as governing board chair

    The Linux Foundation's LF Deep Learning Foundation announced it has added Ciena, DiDi, Intel, Orange and Red Hat to its membership roster.

    Open source communities truly thrive when there's an array of vendors and service providers adding to the collective brain trust. With the recent additions, Deep Learning now has 15 members since it was first formed earlier this year.

    The addition of Orange was notable, but Deep Learning is still missing some key service provider players, such as Verizon, BT, CenturyLink, Deutsche Telekom and Telefónica, which seem content to pursue machine learning and artificial intelligence on their own.

Academy Press Release

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