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Mozilla Development and News

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  • Firefox DevEdition 62 Beta 18 Testday, August 17th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, August 17th, we are organizing Firefox 62 DevEdition Beta 18 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on Activity Stream, React Animation Inspector and Toolbars & Window Controls features. We will also have fixed bugs verification and unconfirmed bugs triage ongoing.

  • How to DoH-only with Firefox

    Firefox supports DNS-over-HTTPS (aka DoH) since version 62.

    You can instruct your Firefox to only use DoH and never fall-back and try the native resolver; the mode we call trr-only. Without any other ability to resolve host names, this is a little tricky so this guide is here to help you. (This situation might improve in the future.)

    In trr-only mode, nobody on your local network nor on your ISP can snoop on your name resolves. The SNI part of HTTPS connections are still clear text though, so eavesdroppers on path can still figure out which hosts you connect to.

    [...]

    network.trr.uri - set this to the URI of the DoH server you want to use. This should be a server you trust and want to hand over your name resolves to. The Cloudflare one we've previously used in DoH tests with Firefox is https://mozilla.cloudflare-dns.com/dns-query.

  • #5 State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 5

    We are happy to share with you the final post of the series, which started with two external research report analyses, moved on to sharing updates and plans for support forums, social support, and localization, and now is about to conclude with our strategic summary.

  • Rep of the Month – July 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Lívia Takács, our Rep of the Month for July 2018!

    Livia is a UI developer and visual designer from Hungary and has been part of the Reps program for a bit more than a year. In that time she organized a lot of events with different communities (like LibreOffice) and also workshops.

  • Updated Firefox 61.0.2 includes Bug Fixes and Automatic Recovery feature for Windows

    The latest update to Firefox 61.0.2 adds support for automatic restoring of Firefox session after Windows is restarted. Presently this feature is not available by default for majority of users but will possibly be enabled gradually in the coming few weeks.

  • Make your Firefox browser a privacy superpower with these extensions

    Privacy is important for everyone, but often in different ways. That’s part of why Firefox Extensions are so powerful. Starting with a browser like Firefox, that’s built for privacy out of the box, you can use extensions to customize your browser to suit your personal privacy needs.

  • The Video Wars of 2027

    This post imagines a dystopian future for web video, if we continue to rely on patented codecs to transmit media files. What if one company had a perpetual monopoly on those patents? How could it limit our access to media and culture? The premise of this cautionary tale is grounded in fact. However, the future scenario is fiction, and the entities and events portrayed are not intended to represent real people, companies, or events.

    [...]

    In 1998, the U.S. Congress passed the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. This new law extended copyrights on corporate works to the author’s lifetime plus 95 years. The effort was driven by the Walt Disney Company, to protect its lucrative retail franchise around the animated character Mickey Mouse. Without this extension, Mickey would have entered the public domain, meaning anyone could create new cartoons and merchandise without fear of being sued by Disney. When the extension passed, it gave Disney another 20 years to profit from Mickey. The news sparked outrage from lawyers and academics at the time, but it was a dull and complex topic that most people didn’t understand or care about.

    In 2020, Disney again lobbied to extend the law, so its copyright would last for 10,000 years. Its monopoly on our culture was complete. No art, music, video, or story would pass into the public domain for millennia. All copyrighted ideas would remain the private property of corporations. The quiet strangulation of our collective creativity had begun.

More in Tux Machines

Events: Plasma Sprint, PyCon, SciPy and All Systems Go!

  • Plasma sprint, 2019 edition; personal updates

    In June, I had a great time at a series of KDE events held in the offices of Slimbook, makers of fantastic Neon-powered laptops, at the outskirts of Valencia, Spain. Following on from a two-day KDE e.V. board of directors meeting, the main event was the 2019 edition of the Plasma development sprint. The location proved to be quite ideal for everything. Slimbook graciously provided us with two lovely adjacent meeting rooms for Plasma and the co-located KDE Usability & Productivity sprint, allowing the groups to mix and seperate as our topics demanded - a well-conceived spatial analog for the tight relationship and overlap between the two. [...] In KDE e.V. news, briefly we stole one of the sprint rooms for a convenient gathering of most of our Financial Working Group, reviewing the implementation of the annual budget plan of the organization. We also had a chance to work with the Usability goal crew (have you heard about KDE goals yet?) on a plan for the use of their remaining budget -- it's going to be exciting. As a closing note, it was fantastic to see many new faces at this year's sprint. It's hard to believe for how many attendees it was their first KDE sprint ever, as it couldn't have been more comfortable to have them on board. It's great to see our team grow.

  • Real Python at PyCon US 2019
  • Quansight presence at SciPy'19

    Yesterday the SciPy'19 conference ended. It was a lot of fun, and very productive. You can really feel that there's a lot of energy in the community, and that it's growing and maturing. This post is just a quick update to summarize Quansight's presence and contributions, as well as some of the more interesting things I noticed.

  • ASG! 2019 CfP Re-Opened!

    Due to popular request we have re-opened the Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2019 for one day. It will close again TODAY, on 15 of July 2019, midnight Central European Summit Time! If you missed the deadline so far, we’d like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly! (And yes, this is the last extension, there's not going to be any more extensions.)

GNOME: GSOC, GNOME Foundation, GLib

  • Gaurav Agrawal: GSOC Progress by Mid July

    July Marked the beginning of II GSOC coding month. This month our goal is to make the diff bar model as accurate and intuitive as possible. One of the biggest thing which I learnt so far is how to contribute on upstream repositories on which our project depends. In our case this was with Libgit2, we discovered a bug in Libgit2 while doing our project, and Albfan made this a perfect example to show me how to contribute on upstream, how to raise bugs and how to do discussions for getting it solved.

  • Jean-François Fortin Tam: Available for hire, 2019 edition

    Sometime after the end of my second term on the GNOME Foundation, I was contacted by a mysterious computer vendor that ships a vanilla GNOME on their laptops, Purism.

  • Array copying and extending in GLib 2.61.2

    A slightly more in-depth post in the mini-series this time, about various new functions which Emmanuel Fleury has landed in GLib 2.61.2 (which is due to be released soon), based on some old but not-quite-finished patches from others.

Programming: Python, Vim, Go and More

  • How to integrate jenkins with webhook
  • Serving Gifs With Discord Bot - Reading Time: 12 Mins
  • Python Snippet 1: More Uses For Else
  • Python Celery Guide
  • Python String Find()
  • PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2

    It hasn’t been long since we published PyCharm 2019.2 Beta, and now we’re ready to share with you the second Beta build! The final release date is getting closer and closer, and while you wait, give PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2 a go! Get the PyCharm 2019.2 Beta build from our website and try all the latest functionality.

  • Vimrc Tutorial

    In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the vimrc file of Vim. Once you’re inside the vimscript, it’s easy to mess things up. That’s why this rule of thumb will always be helpful in your journey with Vim. Don’t put any line in vimrc that you don’t understand.

  • CPU atomics and orderings explained

    Sometimes the question comes up about how CPU memory orderings work, and what they do. I hope this post explains it in a really accessible way.

  • You can't say Go without Google – specifically, our little logo, Chocolate Factory insists

    Back in 2009, Google chose to name its latest programming language Go, a decision that is still giving it a migraine It could have called it "Google Go" to avoid confusion with Frank McCabe's Go! programming language. Despite criticism, it didn't do so. After almost a year of online grumbling, Google software engineer Russ Cox, in 2010, closed GitHub Issue #9, dismissing the complaints as "unfortunate." And the headaches over the thing's name still won't go away (no pun intended.) Last week, Google rebuffed a request to remove its logo from the Go website, golang.org, a change supported by some developers who feel Google takes Go developers for granted.

Games: Kubernetes Within the Context of Video Games, Please, RetroArch

  • Kubernetes: The Video Game

    Grant Shipley was recently in China for KubeCon, where he gave a keynote talk explaining the Kubernetes ecosystem within the context of Video Games. It’s a fun way to examine the entire world of Kubernetes, from end to end, while also enabling Grant to make Mavis Beacon and Commodore 64 references. Take a gander!

  • Please, a tense ten-minute experience has a Linux build available

    Got a few minutes to burn? Why not try out the short experimental experience that Please offers. Developed by somewhat, it delivers something quite surreal and freaky.

  • Achievement Unlocked: RetroArch is Coming to Steam

    Fans of retro (and not so retro) gaming will be pleased to hear that RetroArch is coming to Steam. Not familiar with RetroArch? It’s a user-friendly GUI that makes use of the libretro API. That API allows developers to create, among other things, modular ‘libretro’ cores that act as game emulators for systems like the SNES, Mega Drive and Game Boy. The famed front-end for the popular Libretro API will be available to install on Steam for Windows from July 30. Linux and macOS versions will follow. The libretro cores that power RetroArch can be used with other compatible frontends (like GNOME Games app) but RetroArch is arguably the best one.