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Is There Perfection in The Linux Kernel?

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Linux

In a perfect world, you could compile a brand-new Linux kernel without the need for much configuration and without error.

According to Linus Torvalds, the new 2.6.19 Linux kernel is such an entity.

"It's one of those rare "perfect" kernels," Torvalds wrote in a Linux kernel mailing list posting announcing the new kernel. "So if it doesn't happen to compile with your config (or it does compile, but then does unspeakable acts of perversion with your pet dachshund), you can rest easy knowing that it's all your own d*mn fault, and you should just fix your evil ways."

The 2.6.19 kernel is the fifth and likely final main Linux kernel point release for this year. Among the most noteworthy aspects of the new kernel are three new filesystem additions.

Full Story.

Perfection, maybe.

I installed 2.6.19 this morning with no issues at all, I was impressed. Systems running great.

re: Perfection, maybe

Deathspawner wrote:

I installed 2.6.19 this morning with no issues at all, I was impressed. Systems running great.

Sad I guess I'll have to wait another week. I tend to use the patched sources from gentoo and when 2.6.19 finally hit portage this morning I got the following error and they say now we'll have to wait for r1. Sad


CC drivers/video/fbsplash.o
drivers/video/fbsplash.c:20:26: linux/config.h: No such file or directory
make[2]: *** [drivers/video/fbsplash.o] Error 1

I guess I could grab the vanilla sources (or disable fbsplash). <shrugs>

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

I remember this error...

That's rather strange... I know I've fixed that error before.

AHA! I think I have the solution to your problem, srrlinux. Try running make menuconfig first, then compile. You don't have to change anything... just run it, and it should create the missing config.h.
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Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

I'd give what Spinlock

I'd give what Spinlock mentioned a try, and if that doesn't work then just download the sources manually and give them a go. I am on Gentoo also, but had no problems grabbing the sources off kernel.org and compiling them manually. The latest Kernel -did- seem to change some things around though, so even though your old .config will work, you may need to surf through the configuration and make sure everything is enabled that you need.

There's a new submenu under Device Drivers for S-ATA related modules, and I had to enable S-ATA that way in order to boot into the new kernel. Since it's in a different location, the .config didn't seem to take care of it this time around.

Of course, I could be just talking through my rear since I don't exactly understand why you are running into an error. Good luck either way Wink

menuconfig

nope, that didn't do it. I guess I can wait for r1. Thanks anyway guys.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Huh...

Is it possible you don't have the kernel headers package for your current kernel? It's really strange that it would claim a missing include file...
__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

re: Huh...

Yeah, it was a bug in the gentoo package. r1 appeared today and all is well.

But thanks everyone for their input.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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