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Updated in more ways than one

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Just talk

After a more than a year messing around with Linux on my laptop, I finally took the plunge when Slackware 11 came out. Windows went away, and I popped in my install dvd. I plan on writing up my experience getting it running on my Averatec 3270 one of these days... hopefully in the early days of December.

So about that Macbook... a friend of mine finally bought his last night, and we played with it. I love it... the last time I had the chance to play with a Mac, it was OS7 in my grandmother's newspaper office... a rather underwhelming experience, let me assure you. I had a close friend with OSX, but I never really did anything with his computer... but last night I played with that Macbook Pro, and I was impressed. It was responsive, it wasn't difficult to find things, and best of all, it had a remote... I've decided that I'm going to investigate putting an infrared adapter inside my notebook. tnkgrl of the Averatec Forums added bluetooth to another model from the same maker... I have high hopes for doing something similar on mine. The Apple Remote only costs $30, so if I could get this working, it'd be pimptastic.

Alright, so I REALLY liked the interface in OSX... so, I downloaded Baghira and Kxdocker, and went to work. Now my Slack 11 looks like OSX... eh heh heh... I'm still working out the kinks in Kxdocker, but it seems to work fine. Only downside? I need to upgrade my memory. The interface is really nice... but you notice how sluggish it is. This IS Slackware, after all.

So that leads me to my next project... Making Fluxbox look like OSX. I'll return KDE to its pristine state (or maybe make it look like Windows Classic, I'm not sure which yet), and fix Fluxbox to work like KDE does now (only much faster, of course.) I haven't found anybody else who's done this, so we'll see how it works.

Well, that should sufficiently do it. I'll try to find time to document what I'm doing in future blog posts... posts in the near future, that is. Persephone!

More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

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    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
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