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Will Vista Be a Boon for Linux?

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OS

As enterprises of all stripes and sizes ponder whether or when to upgrade to Windows Vista, they could be confronted with at least three choices.

1) Stay with what they have
2) Migrate to Vista
3) Migrate to Linux

Some of the thinking goes like this:

Vista is a remarkable step forward for many Windows users. It offers a much more sophisticated set of security technologies and default configurations than Windows XP does, even with the security features XP provided with Service Pack 2. Vista attempts to solve the complicated patchwork of bug fixes and workarounds in Window XP SP2. For security reasons alone, Vista is likely to tempt many IT administrators to recommend an upgrade. Vista is also loaded with eye-candy, an improved desktop UI and, let's not forget, a full-fledged media center.

But Vista has higher hardware requirements than its predecessors, which are likely to be a barrier to many companies with older hardware and budgets that don't allow for capital expenditures on new PCs just to run Vista. Let's not forget that Vista itself has a price tag to go with that upgrade decision.

So does this make a case to consider Linux?

Full Story.

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