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Xandros 4.1 Professional - Review

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Linux
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Introduction

Xandros is a distribution based on Debian that is meant for home users and small businesses that use older versions of Windows (98, ME, 2000) while letting those users utilize all of their saved information from Microsoft Office by using CodeWeaver's CrossOver Office, which seamlessly installs and runs a variety of Windows' programs. Xandros is specifically designed for people who have only known and used Windows and offers solitude from viruses, et al. as well as freedom since Xandros is on the Linux platform.

What this means to these types of users is a safer, more efficient computing environment without extreme technical knowledge to install and run a very suitable and substantially inexpensive alternative to Microsoft Windows. This also means that since Xandros is a Linux distribution, that viruses, spyware, ad-ware and trojans are an almost non-existent threat. But to sure up the confidence level, Xandros also implements a full security suite to satisfy even the most paranoid of users when it comes to security and Internet safety.

Installation

Installation has been covered by many reviews of Xandros as it is basically 4 clicks and you're done. The hardest part about installation revolves around any partitioning tasks that can be created/added/extended for any partitions to put Linux on. Fortunately for Xandros users, this step is completely unnecessary if you are going to overwrite any current OS with Xandros. For those who want to dual boot, the partitioning step is easy to follow.

Full Story.

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