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Treo vs. Blackberry: My comparison and verdict

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Sci/Tech

I've been a Treo user since the day the 600 was first released. I waded through the product's instability and growing pains because it was the most workable solution on the market, and eventually because it was rock solid (though it did need the occasional reboot). I was very, very happy with the Treo, and have been waiting for the new 680 or 750 (preferred because of its UMTS high-speed network, though strongly disfavored because the initial version will be on Windows).

But then my Treo was stolen last week at Borders in Palo Alto, and I had to quickly get a replacement.

I went to the Cingular store in search of a 680 but, as Fabrizio notes, announcing a product's availability and its actual availability are two very different things with Palm. The sales representative at the Cingular store suggested that I might like the Blackberry 8700 and, even if I didn't, I could try it out for 30 days and simply return it when the 680s arrived.

I told her I had no interest in the Blackberry, but that I'd try it out on those terms. See, for as long as I've been a Treo lover, I've also been a Blackberry hater. I didn't like the Berry's sense of style (or lack thereof), its clunky software, etc.

One and a half weeks into my trial, I think I'm a believer.

There are things I dislike about the Blackberry:

Full Story.

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