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New Site and Release: Elive 3.0

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Debian

More than 2500 own packages with detailed customizations, tons of customizations and integrations between parts to communicate and work together, own designs, special and unique features, and the gigantic list of characteristics listed here... definitively this is not just a debian with enlightenment.

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  • ELIVE 3.0 STABLE IS RELEASED!

    After 8 years of silent development, the third stable version of Elive is out, the result is simply amazing and the integration is gorgeous, it is not even possible to describe every inside feature and the new website only contains a small portion of its characteristics.

    Unfortunately not everything is rainbows and perfection, the lack of resources made the release being too much delayed, and this leaded to old packages and drivers, but even with that, the final result is really worth of it, Elive 3.0 is the most useful system ever made, perfect for the daily use, rock solid, beautiful and full of hidden features, with every simplified aspect to make it usable for any user level.

    If all this was not enough this version is the most powerful version, maintaining its lightness in resources and blazing fast responsiveness, do not hesitate to put this polished and ready to use system in every computer for any purpose.

    And even better again, the final stable version is entirely cost-free, limitless with all its features, to make it easier to more people in the world can use it, specially the ones with the lower resources.

Not much press coverage so far about Elive 3.0 release

  • Elive 3.0 is out! And it is FREE!!

    After a long period of development, Elive 3.0 has been finally released today.

    Wow, I still remember the first day I saw Elive Topaz 2.0. Never had I seen a distro most beautiful and efficient. However, back then, the live CD asked for payment to download an installation module, which put me (and many other Linux users, I learned later) off.

    Of course, those days, I was still discovering the world of Linux and Free/Open Source Software, so I had many inaccurate ideas about distros. I did not know much about KDE or Gnome, let alone mention Enlightenment. I struggled with GRUB. I still did not understand the functionality of multiple work spaces and, obviously, I assumed that "free software" was meant to be free of cost.

    Gradually, I became more supportive toward the idea of paying for Linux-related work that I loved and that, understandably, was something that I could not do myself due to my technical limitations. I began paying for Mandriva Powerpacks, for example. And I donated money, too.

Elive 3.0 Finally Receives Some Mainstream Coverage

  • Dust off that old Pentium, Linux fans: It's Elive

    What were you doing in 2010? The Space Shuttles were still flying, Toy Story 3 ruled the cinemas, and Apple released its very first iPad. Oh, and Linux distro Elive locked down its last stable build. Until now.

    Designed to run on minimal hardware, Elive is very much a passion project of its leader, Samuel F Baggen. Based on Debian, the first version took a bow in 2005. The second stable version made an appearance in 2010 and it has been a long eight years for the third stable version to become available.

    Elive has an impressively low bar to entry, with hardware requirements for the distribution coming in at 256 MB RAM and a 500 MHz CPU, meaning that some very elderly silicon is theoretically going to be able to enjoy the highly polished Enlightenment desktop.

    "Theoretically" because after The Register took Elive 3.0.0 out for a spin on a relatively low-powered laptop, we'd frankly baulk at running it on anything much slower than a 533MHz Core 2 with at least 512 MB RAM. However, the Enlightenment UI is undeniably an attractive desktop, particularly if a macOS-alike dock is your thing, and runs at an impressive lick even on hardware that lacks graphics acceleration.

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