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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebooks Are Getting Local File Sharing Support

    An upcoming Chrome OS update will add support for SMB shares, meaning Chromebooks will have access to files shared from Windows, macOS, and Linux computers.

    The feature is part of Chrome OS Canary right now, and will come to most Chromebooks with Chrome OS 70 on October 23. A screenshot of the feature in action, seen above, was posted by Google Employee François Beaufort on Google+ yesterday.

  • 5 Ridiculous Windows 10 Headlines That Will Have You Running To Linux
  • An interview with the developer of DXVK, part of what makes Valve's Steam Play tick

    What started as a large article talking to developers about Steam Play required splitting off before it became too big. For now, I give you a chat with the developer of DXVK, Philip Rebohle.

    For those that aren't quite up to speed, DXVK is a project that provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for Wine. It's part of what makes Valve's Steam Play "Proton" work. In simple terms, games built to run on Windows via DirectX can be run with DXVK/Proton, so that they can be played on Linux.

  • Game store itch releases a brand new client, plus a small interview

    Game store itch.io are doing some fantastic things and so it's time to highlight it a bit. They just released a massive overhaul to their open source client!

    Here's how the new and improved client looks, pretty slick right? It's blazingly fast too, from clicking the itch application button to actually logging in took around 2-3 seconds. When you want to just play your game, that's the kind of speed you want to enable you to quickly get going.

  • Last week’s [Slackware] updates: Chromium and VLC

    Last week the Chrome (and Chromium) update to release 69 was in the news. The UI changed significantly, sporting more of Google’s material design elements. Also the password manager has been improved: it will suggest random passwords in cases where you have to create a Web account and will offer to remember the random password in its vault so you don’t have to write it down or remember it (you’ll have to be signed into your Google account to be able to use this feature though).
    The ‘omnibox‘ (the area where you type your URLS and search queries) is more powerful now, showing many more related results while you are typing.
    My package for Chromium supports direct playback of H.265/HEVC video by the way, and has done so for the past releases. Check it out for instance on https://www.h265files.com/embed-h265-video.php . Not many other browsers (even other distros’ Chromium browsers) will do that.

  • Cloudera Launches an End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture with Red Hat and Eurotech to Accelerate IoT Deployments

    Architecture enables end-to-end analytics pushing machine learning and intelligence to the ‘edge’ to support real-time decision-making

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE : CLDR ), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics optimized for the cloud, today announced the launch of an end-to-end, open source Internet of Things (IoT) architecture in collaboration with Red Hat and Eurotech. Enterprises now have a modern IoT architecture that is scalable, secure, and technologically advanced without vendor lock-in.

  • ‘Open Hybrid’ Initiative Targets Big Data Workloads

    ortonworks, IBM and Red Hat today announced they’re banding together to build a consistent hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads. Dubbed the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative, the program pledges simplicity of deployment and freedom of movement for data apps.

    The rapid ascent of cloud computing platforms like AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud has given enterprises abundant new options for storing data and deploying processing-intensive applications, such as deep learning and real-time stream processing. Throw in the progress being made at the edge, with sensors and speedy ARM chips collecting and processing massive amounts of data, and you have the makings of a computing revolution.

    While the computing possibilities in the cloud and on the edge may appear bountiful, the reality is that the underlying architectures for building apps that can span these three modes are just starting to come together. Enterprises today face a dearth of repeatable patterns to guide their developers, administrators, and architects, who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

  • How to overcome two major challenges with digital transformation

    Business leaders of all stripes, not only CIOs, are talking about Digital Transformation these days. Even the World Economic Forum is publishing White Papers on the Digital Transformation of Industries. Even still, whether it’s Netflix passing over the 120 Million Monthly Subscribers mark while still managing 25% Year-on-Year growth, or Peloton stealing gym memberships with over a 100% year-on-year growth rate, it’s clear that businesses need to deliver better and more holistic experiences to customers through digital channels in order to succeed.

    However, organizations often struggle on their digital transformation journey in two fundamental areas. First, in the ability to fund transformational projects. Second, defining and implementing a strategy that ensures their organizations have the skills necessary for the transformational projects.

  • Observe the Analyst’s Thoughts: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Fedora at FrOSCon 2018 – Event report
  • Bring back the headphone jack: Why USB-C audio still doesn't work

     

    Smartphone makers, it’s time to have that come-to-Apple moment, where we tell you that it’s time to put the 3.5mm analog headset jack back on the phone—at least until you get your USB-C audio act in order. After plugging in a fistful of USB-C dongles and USB-C headsets into a stack of USB-C phones, I’ve discovered that it’s a mess, especially for third-party headsets. Here's why.

More in Tux Machines

Events: Plasma Sprint, PyCon, SciPy and All Systems Go!

  • Plasma sprint, 2019 edition; personal updates

    In June, I had a great time at a series of KDE events held in the offices of Slimbook, makers of fantastic Neon-powered laptops, at the outskirts of Valencia, Spain. Following on from a two-day KDE e.V. board of directors meeting, the main event was the 2019 edition of the Plasma development sprint. The location proved to be quite ideal for everything. Slimbook graciously provided us with two lovely adjacent meeting rooms for Plasma and the co-located KDE Usability & Productivity sprint, allowing the groups to mix and seperate as our topics demanded - a well-conceived spatial analog for the tight relationship and overlap between the two. [...] In KDE e.V. news, briefly we stole one of the sprint rooms for a convenient gathering of most of our Financial Working Group, reviewing the implementation of the annual budget plan of the organization. We also had a chance to work with the Usability goal crew (have you heard about KDE goals yet?) on a plan for the use of their remaining budget -- it's going to be exciting. As a closing note, it was fantastic to see many new faces at this year's sprint. It's hard to believe for how many attendees it was their first KDE sprint ever, as it couldn't have been more comfortable to have them on board. It's great to see our team grow.

  • Real Python at PyCon US 2019
  • Quansight presence at SciPy'19

    Yesterday the SciPy'19 conference ended. It was a lot of fun, and very productive. You can really feel that there's a lot of energy in the community, and that it's growing and maturing. This post is just a quick update to summarize Quansight's presence and contributions, as well as some of the more interesting things I noticed.

  • ASG! 2019 CfP Re-Opened!

    Due to popular request we have re-opened the Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2019 for one day. It will close again TODAY, on 15 of July 2019, midnight Central European Summit Time! If you missed the deadline so far, we’d like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly! (And yes, this is the last extension, there's not going to be any more extensions.)

GNOME: GSOC, GNOME Foundation, GLib

  • Gaurav Agrawal: GSOC Progress by Mid July

    July Marked the beginning of II GSOC coding month. This month our goal is to make the diff bar model as accurate and intuitive as possible. One of the biggest thing which I learnt so far is how to contribute on upstream repositories on which our project depends. In our case this was with Libgit2, we discovered a bug in Libgit2 while doing our project, and Albfan made this a perfect example to show me how to contribute on upstream, how to raise bugs and how to do discussions for getting it solved.

  • Jean-François Fortin Tam: Available for hire, 2019 edition

    Sometime after the end of my second term on the GNOME Foundation, I was contacted by a mysterious computer vendor that ships a vanilla GNOME on their laptops, Purism.

  • Array copying and extending in GLib 2.61.2

    A slightly more in-depth post in the mini-series this time, about various new functions which Emmanuel Fleury has landed in GLib 2.61.2 (which is due to be released soon), based on some old but not-quite-finished patches from others.

Programming: Python, Vim, Go and More

  • How to integrate jenkins with webhook
  • Serving Gifs With Discord Bot - Reading Time: 12 Mins
  • Python Snippet 1: More Uses For Else
  • Python Celery Guide
  • Python String Find()
  • PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2

    It hasn’t been long since we published PyCharm 2019.2 Beta, and now we’re ready to share with you the second Beta build! The final release date is getting closer and closer, and while you wait, give PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2 a go! Get the PyCharm 2019.2 Beta build from our website and try all the latest functionality.

  • Vimrc Tutorial

    In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the vimrc file of Vim. Once you’re inside the vimscript, it’s easy to mess things up. That’s why this rule of thumb will always be helpful in your journey with Vim. Don’t put any line in vimrc that you don’t understand.

  • CPU atomics and orderings explained

    Sometimes the question comes up about how CPU memory orderings work, and what they do. I hope this post explains it in a really accessible way.

  • You can't say Go without Google – specifically, our little logo, Chocolate Factory insists

    Back in 2009, Google chose to name its latest programming language Go, a decision that is still giving it a migraine It could have called it "Google Go" to avoid confusion with Frank McCabe's Go! programming language. Despite criticism, it didn't do so. After almost a year of online grumbling, Google software engineer Russ Cox, in 2010, closed GitHub Issue #9, dismissing the complaints as "unfortunate." And the headaches over the thing's name still won't go away (no pun intended.) Last week, Google rebuffed a request to remove its logo from the Go website, golang.org, a change supported by some developers who feel Google takes Go developers for granted.

Games: Kubernetes Within the Context of Video Games, Please, RetroArch

  • Kubernetes: The Video Game

    Grant Shipley was recently in China for KubeCon, where he gave a keynote talk explaining the Kubernetes ecosystem within the context of Video Games. It’s a fun way to examine the entire world of Kubernetes, from end to end, while also enabling Grant to make Mavis Beacon and Commodore 64 references. Take a gander!

  • Please, a tense ten-minute experience has a Linux build available

    Got a few minutes to burn? Why not try out the short experimental experience that Please offers. Developed by somewhat, it delivers something quite surreal and freaky.

  • Achievement Unlocked: RetroArch is Coming to Steam

    Fans of retro (and not so retro) gaming will be pleased to hear that RetroArch is coming to Steam. Not familiar with RetroArch? It’s a user-friendly GUI that makes use of the libretro API. That API allows developers to create, among other things, modular ‘libretro’ cores that act as game emulators for systems like the SNES, Mega Drive and Game Boy. The famed front-end for the popular Libretro API will be available to install on Steam for Windows from July 30. Linux and macOS versions will follow. The libretro cores that power RetroArch can be used with other compatible frontends (like GNOME Games app) but RetroArch is arguably the best one.