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Microsoft is Playing Dirty Again

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Microsoft
  • Windows 10 Tries to Push Firefox and Chrome Over the Edge

    Windows 10 now “warns” you not to install Chrome or Firefox when you download them. It’s just one of the many annoying ways Microsoft pushes Edge, which only has 4% market share despite Microsoft’s increasing desperation.

    Microsoft will probably start using this “app recommendations” feature to push other apps in the future, too. Imagine Windows warning you not to install LibreOffice because you could pay for Office 365 instead.

  • Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

    Microsoft really wants you to use Edge in the latest Windows Insider builds, and the software giant is not afraid to let you know it.

    Windows Insider Sean Hoffman took to Twitter last night to express his displeasure at a pop-up shown by Windows 10 when he attempted to install an alternative browser. When he ran the Firefox installer, a pop-up showed up suggesting perhaps he'd like to stick with Edge. It is safer and faster, after all (according to Microsoft).

    Hoffman, running build 17744.1004, the current slow ring version of the next release of Windows 10, pulled no punches in his reaction.

Microsoft intercepting Firefox and Chrome installation

  • Microsoft intercepting Firefox and Chrome installation on Windows 10

    The intercepting of installers on Windows is a new low, however. A user who initiates the installation of a browser does so on purpose. The prompt that Microsoft displays claims that Edge is safer and faster, and it puts the Open Microsoft Edge button on focus and not the "install anyway" button.

Microsoft in 'Damage Control' Mode

  • Microsoft Abandons Plan to Troll Windows 10 Users With Browser Warnings

    While this Microsoft spokesman calls this a “feature,” it’s worth nothing exactly what it was: A literal “warning” not to install Chrome or Firefox once you’ve downloaded it, interrupting the installation process. As we pointed out, this would train Windows users to ignore real security warnings.

    Of course, the only reason this “test” was unsuccessful is because it enraged Windows 10 users more than usual. If this browser warning was just a feature that generated a normal amount of rage, like automatically installing Candy Crush Saga on Windows 10 Professional, Microsoft wouldn’t have backed off.

    But today, let’s celebrate. We all stopped Microsoft from doing something dumb! The battle is won.

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