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Chrome 69 Tip for GNU/Linux and Beta of Next Chrome Release

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  • Change UI theme in Google Chrome 69

    Say what you will about Chrome, but over the years, it has maintained a rather consistent look & feel. The changes are mostly done under the hood and they do not interfere with how the user interacts with the browser. But occasionally, mostly guided by their wider influence in the OS space, especially the mobile world, Google has made some stylistic changes. Most notably, they introduced Material Design to the Chrome UI, and now, there's another facelift.

    I noticed the new looks in the freshly updated Chrome 69 in Kubuntu Beaver, and I wasn't too happy. The font is gray and pale, ergo contrast isn't as good as it should be, and the new round design feels odd. So I decided to change this back to the older style. Let me show you how you can do this.

    [...]

    There you go. If you don't like the aesthetically pleasing but ergonomically dubious change to the Chrome's UI look in version 69 onwards, then you can change (we don't know for how long) the layout back to what it was, or try one of the several available themes. The goal is to retain maximum visual clarity and efficiency. The old looks offer that. The new ones hamper that.

    I am quite alarmed by this trend. The only solace I get is the knowledge that a few Google shares in me possession are generating profit, which I shall use to heal my soul of all this sub-IQ100 touch-led destruction of the desktop and fast productivity, a crusade that started worldwide around 2011 or so.

  • Chrome 70 beta: shape detection, web authentication, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 70 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 70 is beta as of September 13, 2018.

  • Chrome 70 In Beta With TLS 1.3, Opus Support In MP4 & AV1 Decode

    Following last week's Chrome 69 release, Chrome 70 is now in beta as the latest feature-update to Google's browser.

Google kills its own services. Again.

  • Inbox is signing off: find your favorite features in the new Gmail [Ed: Google says their shareholders no longer saw "value("profit), so they’re giving the middle fingers to so-called ‘customers’ who were actually “products” they sought to ‘monetise’]

    Inbox by Gmail has been a great place to experiment with new ideas like snoozing emails to later, as well as try the latest AI-powered experiences like Smart Reply, Nudges and high-priority notifications to help you stay productive.

  • Google Inbox Is Shutting Down; Switch to Gmail Before March 2019 [Ed: "The cloud" - we don't just change things ('upgrade') without your approval but we also remotely 'delete' things when we feel like it]

    After months of the noticeable slow progress of Inbox, Google has decided to shut down the Inbox project altogether. The Inbox by Gmail is going off the air by March 2019 so fans have about less than 7 months to move over to the everlasting Gmail.

  • The ‘Gmail Offline’ App is Shutting Down, Here’s What to Use Instead

    Do you use Chrome’s Gmail Offline app to access your email offline? That app is shutting down on December 3, but you can still access Gmail offline on your computer.

    For years using Gmail offline meant using a Chrome app with its own user interface. It wasn’t great, but it worked. It’s also no longer necessary: one of the best features in the new Gmail is the ability to use the full Gmail interface offline, without any app to install. It’s a pretty big improvement, and it doesn’t take long to enable.

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